How to Know When to Move Onto Heavier Weights In the Gym

So you’ve been hitting the gym, taking classes, or doing bodyweight workouts for a while now, and suddenly you’re not seeing any more changes in your body. Your muscles aren’t growing, and a lot of the moves you’ve been doing seem easy now.

The likely culprit: You’ve hit a plateau because you’re not lifting enough weight. Maybe you grab the three-pound weights you use in barre class to do curls while weight training, when you could easily lift 10-pounders. Or maybe you’ve been going to strength training classes for six weeks, but you’re still picking up the same dumbbells.

Source: Here’s How to Tell When You Should Lift Heavier Weights

Best to first limit the weight by form (inability to maintain good form means you need to decrease weight/reps and fix the form). Then, given you have a spotter for more dangerous movements – every set is completed for failure (such that your last rep is the last possible with good form – this takes time and training to assess). The target number of reps in each set is dependent on training goals (strength, power, hypertrophy, endurance), and when the completed reps exceed the target reps, it’s an indication to increase load (ergo the weight).

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