John Harvey Kellogg’s Legacy of Cereal, Sociopathy, and Sexual Mutilation

A lot of people aren’t aware of why Kellogg’s Cornflakes came to be…

John Harvey Kellogg was arguably the most famous physician of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. He introduced the concept of eating clean foods, exercise, and other healthful innovations. He was also the guy who invented cornflakes. And, in my opinion, he was a very bad man. The worst kind of bad, in fact: the kind that sleeps easy at night, believing his horrible work was the will of God.

Nothing is more dangerous than a monster with a clear conscience.

Source: John Harvey Kellogg’s Legacy of Cereal, Sociopathy, and Sexual Mutilation

He’s a pretty good example of “I have a problem so all the rest of you must be wrong.” Hey dude. If coffee and tea get you sexually excited…well maybe you’re the ONLY ONE who really needs to stop drinking coffee and tea, or dipping your balls in it or whatever the fuck you were doing that got you on this tear, mmkay?

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What to Eat Before an Endurance Race

So you’ve decided to tackle an endurance race—maybe a marathon or half marathon, maybe a triathlon, century ride, all-day hike, or some other multi-hour effort. Of the many tough decisions you’ll make that day, one of the first is: What should you eat for breakfast?

There’s only one right answer, in a sense, and that is: Whatever you practiced during your training. Race day is not the time to try anything new, because you’ll be living with the consequences for several (possibly agonizing) hours. Still, you have to start somewhere, so here are some of the things you’ll want to keep in mind to prepare the best breakfasts.

Source: What to Eat Before an Endurance Race

Here are the rules that can’t be stressed enough:

  1. NO SURPRISES ON RACE DAY.  That includes finding out what type of gels or drinks they might be handing out. Find out in advance, try out in advance.
  2. It’s very personal.  Some like gels, some do not.  Vice versa.  There’s no wrong answer, just what works for you.

For me, gels take a while to kick in.  And it really depends on what what I’ve eaten and how soon.  Which is great – knowing that, I can take one before getting in the water so it hits when I’m on the bike.  But I was finding myself quite parched when I got to running – and it’s been hard to drink water while on the run.

Your mileage may vary 😉

Use Chickpea Liquid to Make the Fluffiest Egg-Free Pancakes Ever

Recipes and techniques generally advance in baby steps. It’s rare that you find a technique so far out of left field that it changes the way people think about food overnight. Sous vide cooking is up there, as is no-knead bread. In the world of vegan cuisine, nothing has shaken things up like aquafaba—the recently coined term for the liquid inside a can of cooked beans. It’s the kind of technique that’s so mind-blowingly simple that I’m amazed nobody discovered it until just a couple of years ago.

Source: Use Aquafaba to Make Extra-Light, Fluffy Egg-Free or Vegan Pancakes

I discovered aquafaba with a recipe for two ingredient meringues a few months ago. It has since nearly completely replaced my use of prepackaged egg substitutes. I am eating a lot more chickpeas now as a result. I’ve also found that canned chickpeas freeze well and defrost quickly.

Cook Puff Pastry in Your Waffle Iron for a Croissant-Like Treat

If you thought waffle iron is a one trick pony. Think again. Let me present the Croffle. When croissant meets waffle. So you take your thought of pastry for the size of my waffle iron I cut it into quarters. Now you just place it, press it and wait. Four to five minutes depending on your waffle iron should do the trick Look at that. It is just as crispy as a croissant, but it’s shaped like a waffle. You could treat it like a waffle and pour maple syrup on top. Seriously, would you take a look at that? Or I was struck with inspiration while I was doing this because I love a good croissant but you know what I like even better. A pennel schokolade. Yes. Puff pastry, chocolate chips. Fold and press. [MUSIC] I’m trying to think of what I could call that. A panochocowaffle? Meh.

Source: How to Make Croissant Waffle

I slightly undercook sheets of phyllo dough in the waffler, pull the sheets out, and then spread a generous layer of raspberry jelly on each side with a sprinkling of grated very dark chocolate on top of each side. Put the two sides together and bake in the oven for 4-6 minutes at 350° or cut into quarters or squares in a preheated (NOT heating – it will scorch the dough) toaster oven for 2-3 minutes. Raspberry and dark chocolate are sinful.

The Key to Perfectly Cheesy, Melty Omelettes

Here’s a perennial omelette problem: You want the cheese in the center to be warm and melted, but by the time the cheese melts, the eggs are overcooked. Conversely, you can have perfectly tender curds of egg, but barely melted cheese. What’s the solution?

The trick is to give the cheese a head start in melting by mixing it with hot ingredients.

Source: The Food Lab: A Quick Guide to Stuffing Omelettes

I’ll try this, but the best thing I ever did was learn how to make an omelette, French style, from old Julia Child videos on YouTube:

The Best Dishes for Luxurious Make-Ahead Breakfasts/Brunch

As I was planning my Mother’s Day brunch a few weeks ago, I looked back through our tips and advice for making brunch ahead of time and discovered that we have written quite a lot on this topic over the years. What can I say — most of us aren’t morning people! When making brunch, we like to get a head start.

In case you’re planning your own Mother’s Day or graduation brunch, let me share some of our make-ahead advice with you, distilled into a few tips and recipe recommendations.

Source: Our Guide to the Make-Ahead Brunch

Quiche is a great make ahead breakfast, but I prefer a making a 10 egg crustless slow-cooker quiche/frittata on my day off and eating it over 3-5 days. It takes about 4 unattended hours on low heat but it comes out super light and fluffy.

Make Delicious Vegan Waffles With Tofu Instead of Eggs

As controversial as sneaking healthy ingredients into junky kid-foods may be (I’ve been known to throw stones myself), parents need to do what they need to do. And, in at least this one case, doing the unthinkable in the name of health led to a totally genius result.

The unthinkable? Emptying an entire package of tofu into the waffle batter.

Source: Genius Crispy, Fluffy (Vegan) Waffles with a Very Strange Secret Ingredient

Sugar in a vegan recipe?!  I could just waffle on and on… 😉

I don’t get why haters are so quick to point out that things don’t taste identical to their non-vegan/etc counterpart.  Besides the ideological aspect, the health aspect is valid.  And lots of recipes we use today came from people experimenting on existing recipes.  Though, I do wonder if chasing foods deemed no longer acceptable leads to the semi-vegetarianism that’s been reported in the past

Turn Leftover Pasta into a Filling Breakfast Frittata

The next time you find yourself with a neglected cup of macaroni or that last serving of spaghetti that no one seems to want, promise me you’ll try this. I’ve been making pasta frittatas ever since another Kitchn writer mentioned it years ago, and it is hands down my favorite way to use up leftover pasta—along with whatever else is hanging around in the fridge.

Source: Leftover Pasta? Make a Frittata!

Perfect for weekend brunch! 😉

Make Fluffier Scrambled Eggs With a Little Seltzer Water

I’ll skip the thick, flat, dense eggs, thank you very much. Instead my favorite scrambled eggs involve a plate piled high with large, soft yellow curds that spring back with the lightest touch and practically melt in my mouth; the kind of eggs that are fluffy and almost cloud-like.

A quick splash of milk or cream certainly makes for tender eggs, and might even give them some fluff, but there’s another ingredient that does the job even better.

Source: Get Even Fluffier Scrambled Eggs with This Unexpected Ingredient

I don’t know man. Mountain Dew Eggs sounds like a complete breakfast.

I’ve never used seltzer, but a little water in scrambled eggs rather than milk… I do think it makes for a better, fluffier texture. I will try out the seltzer too, makes sense.