Why Do We Have Standard Eating Times (IE Breakfast, Lunch)?

Back in the day, every single meal had to be prepared from scratch. To feed large families, staff and/or communities more effectively there was division of labour.  A few people cook, others do different work and show up at given times to eat together.

A proper schedule is essential when many people have to physically live and work together in the same space and time.  It has nothing to do with biology, and everything to do with economics and practicality.  Also, don’t forget the benefits of the bonding that takes place when people gather for a meal. It makes for a stronger family/community.

Imagine a tribe where everyone ate at random, different times. Nothing would ever get done. Imagine a job that takes two people such as pulling a felled tree through the forest. You’re pulling it back to the tribe. Suddenly the other person decides he is hungry and goes and eats. You sit down for an hour and he gets back. You pull the tree some more then now you’re hungry. He sits down for another hour while you go off to get food.

You can see how this changes from region to region. Different places can have different appropriate times for lunch or dinner.  In Chile I’d have lunch at 1-2, but in Mexico most people have it at around 3-4, while in Canada I see them eat at noon. It’s not weird, but those times can be dictated by environment – the closer to the equator, the less likely things will be happening at noon.   Your job would also be a big factor; miners would probably just eat whenever they were hungry as there’s no sun to follow and timekeeping methods would be expensive to use (e.g candle clocks) while sailors would probably eat whenever they weren’t busy with other time sensitive jobs (e.g. fishing).  But it’s the industrial revolution and the mechanization of society that cemented concrete times for meals based on breaks and start/ends of shifts.

Waffle Smores Are the Dessert, Breakfast, or Anytime Snack You’ve Been Waiting for

The only thing saving me is that I don’t have a waffle iron handy.

Add Rolled Oats to Upgrade Your Smoothie to a Filling Meal

Love the idea of a smoothie for breakfast, but wish it filled you up a little more? I hear you, and I’m totally with you. My main criteria for any breakfast, including smoothies, is one that isn’t going to leave my stomach grumbling a couple hours later.

My key to a good breakfast smoothie is making sure it has the power to carry me through the morning. One of the easiest ways to do this? Add a scoop of oats!

Source: Oats Are the Key to a Satisfying Smoothie

I’ve thrown oats into my morning protein shake, my staple breakfast for years.  I’ve found that quick-cooking oats blend better and don’t wreak havoc on your stomach as much as whole or steel-cut varieties.

Eggnog Makes The Tastiest Three-Ingredient French Toast Ever

Each year we splurge on this amazing locally made eggnog since it’s the only time of year they make it. One of our family traditions is to trim the Christmas tree while drinking eggnog and munching on cookies.

And one of the best parts about having this eggnog around? It makes the best French toast ever.

Source: Why Leftover Eggnog Makes the Best French Toast

Try it in a baked recipe for a bread pudding-like breakfast.

This Robot Reads WikiHow Guides to Learn How to Make Breakfast

As robots become more common in offices and homes, more humans will need to communicate with them. Sadly, bots still can’t converse or read or write well—yet. A European research project is looking to fix this limitation with a WikiHow-skimming kitchen robot that uses text and voice commands to throw together grub.

Source: This Robot Reads WikiHow Guides to Learn How to Make Breakfast

It’s interesting to read about this, a precursor to artificial intelligence.  Making food is complex, the steps are repeatable, and there’s room for creativity.  All while being very cost-effective…  It’s not so surprising, considering the table tech Ikea was positing a couple of months back.  No mention of AI calorie counting though…

The Best Method for Making Any Kind of Stuffed Pancakes

If you click that link, it will only make you hungry. You’ve been warned 😉

…there are plenty of recipes out there for “Nutella-stuffed pancakes,” which consist of sandwiching Nutella between two pancakes. But this recipe includes a life-changing trick for getting perfect portions of Nutella into one pancake.

Source: An Ingenious Trick for Making Perfect Nutella-Stuffed Pancakes

Mind that there is vitamin K in nutella.  But the trick would work for any sort of filling – peanut butter, jam, jelly, chocolate, fruit compote…

Prevent Soggy or Burnt French Toast by Frying in Oil Instead of Butter

A plate of perfect French toast—crispy round the edges, custardy in the center, and capped off with an amber kiss of maple syrup—is a thing of breakfast time beauty. On the other hand, slices that turn out soggy and squishy, charred in some spots and undercooked in others… well, there’s nothing sadder. What could go wrong? We’ve identified five common French toast mistakes and how to fix them.

Source: You’ve Been Making French Toast All Wrong (Here’s How to Do It Right)

To get the best of both worlds – the smoke point of butter is lower, but yields more flavour and colours the food more quickly, often burning.  So heat a little oil, then add some butter…  You get the benefits of more colour and flavour from the butter, and get a slightly higher smoke point than if using just butter which is more likely to avoid burning yet still allowing for crispy non soggy toast. This method works well for many things, particularly fish.

For Richer Scrambled Eggs, Use Sour Cream Instead of Milk

…assuming you use dairy products.  There is vitamin K in sour cream, but you take a lesson from Gordon Ramsey and use Crème Fraîche – which supposedly does not have any vitamin K:

Greek yogurt is another alternative, and my recipe calls for water so as not to alienate the lactose intolerant.  The taste/texture hasn’t been an issue to me – I usually add sauteed mushrooms & onions, grape/cherry tomatoes, and sriracha.  Almost an omelette, and some originally were planned to be omelettes… 😉

How the Tudors Invented Breakfast

In the Middle Ages, the nation that was to give the world the full English widely skipped breakfast. Yet, by 1600, a culinary non-entity had become a key part of our daily routine. Why the change? Ian Mortimer investigates.

Source: How the Tudors invented breakfast

You’ll find out the different between “dinner” and “supper”, at least as they originally were.  The article doesn’t mention the Continental breakfast, but you can see the evolution from the “travellers breakfast”.