Why Do We Have Standard Eating Times (IE Breakfast, Lunch)?

Back in the day, every single meal had to be prepared from scratch. To feed large families, staff and/or communities more effectively there was division of labour.  A few people cook, others do different work and show up at given times to eat together.

A proper schedule is essential when many people have to physically live and work together in the same space and time.  It has nothing to do with biology, and everything to do with economics and practicality.  Also, don’t forget the benefits of the bonding that takes place when people gather for a meal. It makes for a stronger family/community.

Imagine a tribe where everyone ate at random, different times. Nothing would ever get done. Imagine a job that takes two people such as pulling a felled tree through the forest. You’re pulling it back to the tribe. Suddenly the other person decides he is hungry and goes and eats. You sit down for an hour and he gets back. You pull the tree some more then now you’re hungry. He sits down for another hour while you go off to get food.

You can see how this changes from region to region. Different places can have different appropriate times for lunch or dinner.  In Chile I’d have lunch at 1-2, but in Mexico most people have it at around 3-4, while in Canada I see them eat at noon. It’s not weird, but those times can be dictated by environment – the closer to the equator, the less likely things will be happening at noon.   Your job would also be a big factor; miners would probably just eat whenever they were hungry as there’s no sun to follow and timekeeping methods would be expensive to use (e.g candle clocks) while sailors would probably eat whenever they weren’t busy with other time sensitive jobs (e.g. fishing).  But it’s the industrial revolution and the mechanization of society that cemented concrete times for meals based on breaks and start/ends of shifts.

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Keep Weekday Meals Simple to Encourage Cooking at Home

…as far as expending Frugalwoods bucks on restaurant meals, we’ve clocked in at a grand total of $51.26 for the year—once for Mr. FW’s 31st birthday and once for our 7th anniversary.

This wasn’t accidental kismet, but rather a concerted alignment with our year of extreme frugality (which, by the way, continues on). Pre-homestead and early retirement aspirations, we ate out fairly often—on average, once a week, which now seems unthinkable to us. But at the time, it was what we were accustomed to.

Source: How We Broke Our Eating Out Habit In 9 Steps

So far, I’ve been doing pretty well. I’ve only “eaten out” for two meals, both the other day, and both were in the hospital cafeteria as we were waiting for a friend having surgery, so I don’t feel too guilty about that. Two meals out of 40 possible so far is a huge improvement for me.

Making Healthy Foods the Default Menu Dupes People Into Eating Better

If you serve it, they will eat it—or at least that seems to be a take-away from a new study on healthy menu options published in an upcoming issue of the Journal of the Association for Consumer Research.

Source: Making healthy foods the default menu dupes people into eating better

Not surprising. The default effect at work.

It’s also hard to make judgements based on data from a Disney theme park. It’s something that’s far out of the norm, and people tend to spend a lot more money there, and tend to eat things they wouldn’t normally eat.

Here is How Dinner Changed Over the Last 100 Years

At three minutes long, it’s not going to show a lot.  There’s no narration either.

Though it’s only one meal per time period, 1915 suggests the simplicity due to probably both resources (food and kitchen).  The TV dinner makes an appearance, and towards the end – multiculturalism becomes apparent with tacos and sushi after that.  We’ve known for a while about tortillas and salsa are outselling previously popular fast food like burgers

This Is Why It’s So Hard to Know If You Have Food Poisoning

You’re feeling queasy, your forehead is clammy, and all that tea you’ve been mainlining is doing nothing at all to perk you back up. What happens next is why it’s so hard to know if you had food poisoning or just a brush with the flu.

Source: This Is Why It’s So Hard to Know If You Have Food Poisoning

Curious about what to to do if you suspect food poisoning?  Or how your stomach knows when to vomit?

Use Up Souring Milk by Making Pancakes and Waffles With It

One man’s trash is another man’s treasure.

As we show in the video above, this is what chef Dan Barber demonstrated earlier this year, when he temporarily turned Blue Hill, his Michelin-starred restaurant in New York City, into an incubator for garbage-to-plate dining.

Barber’s intent was to raise awareness about the vast issue of food waste. As we’ve reported, an estimated 133 billion pounds of food is wasted in the U.S. each year. The typical American family tosses out about $1,500 of food yearly.

Source: Don’t Toss That Sour Milk! And Other Tips to Cut Kitchen Food Waste

Pasteurized milk doesn’t sour – it putrefies. Only raw milk will sour and not many people can even get that anymore. Any milk sold at the grocery store is pasteurized…  Alternately, you can make something like clabbered milk by adding a little bit of acid to your milk – lemon juice or white vinegar both work.  This tip also works for Russian style crepes (blini).

I don’t know that “garbage to plate” is the best way to sell this to people.  I think everybody can enjoy tips like this to make use of things considered waste that really aren’t.

Smaller Tableware ‘Could Help Reduce Over-eating and Obesity’

Shrinking the size of plates, knives, forks and glasses could go some way towards tackling over-eating and obesity, a study suggests.

Smaller tableware was identified as having a positive effect on consumption habits, along with reductions in portion size and food packaging.  Researchers found that reversing the current “super-size” trend could lower average calorie intake by up to 16% in the UK and 29% in the US – the land of huge helpings.

Source: Smaller tableware ‘could help reduce over-eating and obesity’

I’m sure that this will work for some, and when others get hungry because they’re eating less – going for seconds might prompt reflection.  But it doesn’t for my cousin…  Last time I visited, they served as much in a single sitting as I consume throughout the week.

Family Eating Rules That Can Help Transform Picky Eaters

These are our suggested 10 “rules” of picky-free parenting…

Source: 10 Rules for Picky-Free Parenting

I’ve previously covered an article about tips for dealing with picky eaters without tricks.  And be aware that picky eating can be an indication of emotional issues

Good luck! 🙂

Five Mind Tricks That’ll Make Your Food “Taste” Better

If you’re worried about impressing someone with your cooking skills, or you’re trying a new recipe for the first time, there are some mental tricks you can use on others to make your meal seem better than it really is. Here are five of the most effective.

Source: Five Mind Tricks That’ll Make Your Food “Taste” Better

Trick #6: Add salt

Some things that weren’t covered in the article, were covered in a previous one about why airline food tastes bland.