The Secret to Amazing Tomato-Based Sauce: Roasting It In the Oven

It starts the usual way sauces do—sauté onion and garlic, add some chile flakes, then booze, then tomatoes, but then it swerves off course. Here’s the secret to its success: You take this perfectly adequate sauce and roast it in the oven for an hour and a half.

Source: A Genius Technique for the Best Vodka Pasta (And Better Marinara, Too)

I sometimes start my sauce by caramelizing my tomato paste in olive oil over the heat, then deglazing that with about 1/4 bottle of red wine. The sweet caramelized tomato paste/wine combo makes things really punchy in the end, even through a long simmer.

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Make Almost Any Boring Protein Into a Delicious Meal by “Piccata-ing” it

A whole bunch of us grew up eating chicken piccata at Italian-American restaurants with our parents, or at least I did, preceded by an entire serving of fried calamari, and breadsticks too. I’d eat every last little swipe of sauce, excited at how it made the back of my tongue water, at how smooth it felt, at how it draped itself over long strips of pasta. It’s a thrilling sauce. Even more thrilling is the fact that you can use it on any protein that goes well with lemon and wine. (Even tofu and chickpeas!)

Source: How to Piccata Anything

This would work with a number of standard chicken dishes, just apply the sauce to whatever other meat you’re eating, even hot dogs and hamburgers.

Use a Wok to Make Soup (and Other Non-Stir Fried Foods)

Have you ever used your wok to boil pasta? Chef Ming Tsai, author of Simply Ming One-Pot Meals, says you should try it.

Source: From stir-frying to making soup, 6 ways to use a wok

Q: Will a wok fit in the dishwasher?

A: Don’t wash the wok, nor anything cast-iron for that matter.

Quick rinse in hot water (even water heated in the wok on the stove!) and a stiff brushing is all they should ever get, ever. Woks and cast-iron skillets will be almost nonstick due to this treatment.

Super Fun Illustrations of 42 Different Types of Ramen

Ramen is everywhere because ramen can be eaten with pretty much anything and in any style but more importantly because ramen is almost always delicious. Designer Fanny Cheuk Chu previously made a poster that detailed 25 different varieties of ramen but is back with a bigger and better version that includes 42 styles of ramen now. She illustrated them in her own unique style with descriptions on what makes each ramen variation unique (like what’s in the broth and what toppings are used). You will want to eat them all. Or at least I do.

Source: Super Fun Illustrations of 42 Different Types of Ramen

One-Pan Pasta Is Easy to Make, Filling, and Requires Next to No Cleanup

I was skeptical until I read this charming background story on Food52–apparently it comes from a legit chef in Puglia by way of two super fun women who worked for Martha and were having a great night out.

The Late Night in Puglia That Gave Us Martha Stewart’s One-Pan Pasta (+ 7 New Ones)

You Don’t Need to Boil Your Pasta, Just the Water

Most instructions for cooking dried pasta are invariably the same: Drop the noodles into a pot of boiling water, bring it back to a boil, and keep it bubbling vigorously until the pasta is done. We already broke with this conventional wisdom by showing that you can cook pasta in a lot less water than is typically called for, as long as you don’t mind stirring it frequently.

Now we’ve learned that you don’t need to hold your pasta water at a rolling boil either. In fact, you don’t even need to keep the pot on the heat. The pasta will cook just fine if you take the pot off the burner as soon as you add the pasta, cover it immediately, stir once or twice during the first minute, cover again, and leave it to sit for the recommended cooking time. We tested this method with spaghetti, shells, farfalle, and ziti, using the full 4 quarts of water recommended per pound, and we found that the texture was identical to that of pasta we boiled the conventional way.

Source: What Is Low-Temp Pasta?

Don’t forget that you can bring that water to a boil faster if you microwave half of it first.  And know why to use cold water, rather than hot.

Make Easy, Delicious Cold Noodles with This Simple Soy Vinaigrette

Here’s to easy hangover food 😉 😀

  • Chard is really high in vitamin K – I don’t recommend taking up the habit if you don’t regularly eat it already.
  • The video measures the liquid in grams – the recipe here has common measurements.
  • The chef strains out the ginger and garlic… This appears to be a bit of ad libbing. While the original directions state to “strain”, it does not specifically call out garlic and/or ginger.

“Drunken” Pasta Makes for Quick, Delicious Weeknight Meals

They suggest garlic, red pepper, fresh herbs, grated parmesan or romano cheese, olive oil, onions, even cannellini beans if you want to make it a little heartier.

If you decide to add aromatics like garlic or dried herbs, simmer them in olive oil first and add some of the cooking liquid from the pasta. The starches in the cooking liquid will help mingle the flavours together. Just before you serve the pasta, toss in those extra ingredients.

How to Pass Off Store-Bought Food as Your Own

Taking it out of the container would be a start 😉

From now until January 2nd, you’ll be invited to many parties of the house, cocktail, and dinner variety. If you love to cook, making and bringing something won’t be a problem, but if you have the baking skills of a young Cher Horowitz, you may need to lie. By “lie” I mean “buy some food you did not make and pretend you did.” This isn’t honest, or righteous, or even very easy, but it can be done.

Source: How to Pass Off Store-Bought Food as Your Own

I figured if I covered cranberry sauce, why stop there?