Cook Puff Pastry in Your Waffle Iron for a Croissant-Like Treat

If you thought waffle iron is a one trick pony. Think again. Let me present the Croffle. When croissant meets waffle. So you take your thought of pastry for the size of my waffle iron I cut it into quarters. Now you just place it, press it and wait. Four to five minutes depending on your waffle iron should do the trick Look at that. It is just as crispy as a croissant, but it’s shaped like a waffle. You could treat it like a waffle and pour maple syrup on top. Seriously, would you take a look at that? Or I was struck with inspiration while I was doing this because I love a good croissant but you know what I like even better. A pennel schokolade. Yes. Puff pastry, chocolate chips. Fold and press. [MUSIC] I’m trying to think of what I could call that. A panochocowaffle? Meh.

Source: How to Make Croissant Waffle

I slightly undercook sheets of phyllo dough in the waffler, pull the sheets out, and then spread a generous layer of raspberry jelly on each side with a sprinkling of grated very dark chocolate on top of each side. Put the two sides together and bake in the oven for 4-6 minutes at 350° or cut into quarters or squares in a preheated (NOT heating – it will scorch the dough) toaster oven for 2-3 minutes. Raspberry and dark chocolate are sinful.

Freeze Cranberry Sauce and Gravy for The Best Thanksgiving Croissants Possible

Making Thanksgiving croissants is a three-day process. I started making the compound butter two days ago. I paddled together butter and Thanksgiving spices: dried sage, dried thyme, granulated onion, onion powder, salt, sugar, pepper, and a little turmeric for color. We developed the recipe from looking at the ingredient list for Stovetop stuffing.

Source: How to Make Thanksgiving Croissants

Lots assume that there will be a lot of leftover gravy. In my experience, gravy always runs out long before the turkey does, and I often have to cobble together substitutes for that first yummy batch with the meat dripping and carving juices.  So if you run out:

Roast and then simmer the giblets with veggies to get some flavorful broth to add to the pan drippings. Start with a (I know, it’s horrible) store-bought stock, dissolve flour or cornstarch in water, add it to the boiling stock, then add the giblet stock and pan drippings. If you use decent quality store stock, you won’t notice the difference and you can make half a gallon of gravy.  Or buy a couple of turkey thighs or legs and roast them a few days ahead and store the deglazed pan drippings in the freezer until the big day.