Make an Egg-Free Caesar Dressing Out of Cashews

In the realm of big salads with even bigger dressings, the Caesar—with it’s sharp garlic, salty anchovy, and sour lemon juice—is emperor of them all.

For most people, it’s addictive. But there’s a contingent that avoids Caesar salad because it requires a raw egg or two. (We’re not all Rocky Balboa, after all.)

While cooking through the entire January issue of Bon Appétit, I found the Caesar dressing even the most squeamish eater can indulge in. It swaps out the raw egg in favor of a different ingredient: cashews.

Source: How to Make an Eggless Caesar Dressing

I hope I’m not in too late with this but I can confirm cashews make some awesome creamy stuff— once I was fed a vegan “cheesecake” that was creamy-thick and delicious. (I just wish people would come up with original names for this delicious stuff though, shit’s ridiculous.)

Use Tahini Instead of Mayo for Creamier, Delicious Pasta Salad

When it comes to pasta salad, I’m firmly in the no-mayonnaise camp. In an effort to avoid the whole mayo-laden dish sitting out in the hot sun conundrum, I usually dress my pasta salad in a light vinaigrette before serving it at a barbecue.

But what if you want something a little creamier? That’s where tahini comes in.

Source: Why You Should Be Putting Tahini in Your Pasta Salad

Tahini is such a better nutrition choice than mayonnaise.

Mix the Perfect Fruit Salad With the Mad-Libs Method

Here the analogy ends, because, while not even a Snoop Dogg remix could save “We Are the World,” a better fruit salad is well within reach. The trick is to dress it up with the same little flourishes that make savory salads so enticing.

Source: The Mad-Libs Method for Perfect Fruit Salad in Any Season

Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit; wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.

The Best Dishes for Luxurious Make-Ahead Breakfasts/Brunch

As I was planning my Mother’s Day brunch a few weeks ago, I looked back through our tips and advice for making brunch ahead of time and discovered that we have written quite a lot on this topic over the years. What can I say — most of us aren’t morning people! When making brunch, we like to get a head start.

In case you’re planning your own Mother’s Day or graduation brunch, let me share some of our make-ahead advice with you, distilled into a few tips and recipe recommendations.

Source: Our Guide to the Make-Ahead Brunch

Quiche is a great make ahead breakfast, but I prefer a making a 10 egg crustless slow-cooker quiche/frittata on my day off and eating it over 3-5 days. It takes about 4 unattended hours on low heat but it comes out super light and fluffy.

It’s Time to Stop Eating Bagged Salads

It pains me to say this, because I’m lazy. But after the umpteenth outbreak of food poisoning from bags of freshly washed greenery, I think it’s time we all stop eating bagged salads.

Source: It’s Time to Stop Eating Bagged Salads

TLDR: bagged lettuce comes from a number of different farms, and because it has multiple sources, each possibly with bacteria on it, increasing the risk of contamination. That’s versus lettuce sourced from a single farm.

Make Colorful, Tangy Sprinkles Out of Dried Fruit

On a new-year-new-you kick and all about that clean-eating life? God knows I’m not, but I’m all about experimenting in the kitchen and looking into ways to cut out any unnecessary added sugar and preservatives. Enter these technicolor “sprinkles,” made from at-home dehydrated citrus zest and unsweetened, freeze-dried fruit.

Source: Recipe: Sugar-Free Citrus & Fruit Sprinkles

Because there’s no sugar, the flavour will be sour/bitter.

This would be perfect for those that like to buy plain yogurt because they want to avoid added sugars and other ingredients. You could make your own fruit powders using a dehydrator, or your oven on its lowest setting, and then just toss the dust into a salt shaker with some rice to help keep the moisture out and increase its shelf life (but you would probably want to store it in the fridge when not in use).

Why Chicken Broth Packs a Bigger Flavor Punch than Beef Broth

Here’s my list of 22 common supermarket ingredients that you should never put in your shopping cart, along with suggestions on what to look for instead.

Source: 22 Supermarket Items You Should Leave on the Shelf (and What to Get Instead)

  • I don’t like beefsteak tomatoes, period.
  • Better Than Bouillon = better than bouillon, boxes, etc.

Grow Fresh Green Onions Any Time of Year In a Plastic Bottle

How nice would it be to just be able to pluck fresh green onions from the soil whenever you need them? Nothing beats fresh onions for your salads, dips or soup. But how can you ensure a supply of fresh onions at hand all the time?

Source: Growing Onions Vertically on the Windowsill

For those that remember it, it’s like a chia pet… but is actually useful.

You can make things easier by just putting the roots of the onions you bought in a shallow glass of water:

They’ll grow back in about a week as long as you change the water every couple days. The disadvantage is they don’t last in the long run.

Infused Oils are a Very Fancy, Very Lazy DIY Gift

Step into any specialty food shop and you’ll encounter shelves of fancy vinegars and flavored oils. While the sleek packaging (such pretty bottles!) and infinite flavor combinations make them tempting purchases, it’s far less expensive to make your own—and almost as easy as plunking down a credit card. Not only do they make excellent host/hostess gifts, we’re seeing them in fine dining settings, too—AL’s Place in San Francisco infuses oil with kuri squash peels and kale stems, and at a recent pop-up dinner in anticipation of his new restaurant, chef Bo Bech served an oil infused with pine needles taken from a tree in the lobby of the NoMad Hotel—that’s right, Christmas tree oil. Here’s how to make your own.

Source: Even Lazy People Can Make This Fancy Edible Gift

Be careful about botulism when you’re using fresh herbs. Use within a week. I believe you can put your fresh herbs in a food dehydrator to remove the water content.

The Best Pumpkin for Making Pies Isn’t the Sugar Pumpkin

…I don’t hate pumpkin pie. I just hate canned pumpkin pie. Here are the fresh pumpkins that made me finally see what I’d been missing.

Source: The Extra Step That Makes Pumpkin Pie Unforgettable

It’s really not that much more work to make your own, homemade pumpkin puree. Cut the pumpkin in quarters, scrape out the guts, roast for ~1 hour. Peel the skin off the flesh and toss it into the food processor with the rest of the ingredients.