Study: Probiotics Don’t Do Shit for Healthy Adults’ Shit

A new study suggests that if you’re a healthy adult without any underlying conditions mucking up your digestion, you might want to think twice before spending your hard-earned dollars on probiotics.

Source: Study: Probiotics Don’t Do Shit for Healthy Adults’ Shit

There are lots of personal anecdotes about probiotics helping someone through digestion related issues.  If it works for you, that’s all that really matters.

Advertisements

Boost Store-Bought Hummus With a Dollop of Greek Yogurt

…the hummus issue — as in “Where would I find hummus in the suburbs?” — was very very real. Especially when it dominoed into similar disconcerting questions about pad thai, bagels, sushi, and…uh, soul mates. (This pros-and-cons business was a slippery slope, especially when crafted in a bout of insomnia in the middle of the night.)

If only I had known about Heidi’s Hummus Hack! I would’ve gotten a lot more sleep.

Source: The Hummus Hack

I didn’t think making hummus was that involved to get premade.  Canned garbanzo beans/chickpeas would serve as soaked if you didn’t prep.

But strained garbanzos, Greek yogurt and seasoning could make a healthy, quick lunch/meal.

Make Colorful, Tangy Sprinkles Out of Dried Fruit

On a new-year-new-you kick and all about that clean-eating life? God knows I’m not, but I’m all about experimenting in the kitchen and looking into ways to cut out any unnecessary added sugar and preservatives. Enter these technicolor “sprinkles,” made from at-home dehydrated citrus zest and unsweetened, freeze-dried fruit.

Source: Recipe: Sugar-Free Citrus & Fruit Sprinkles

Because there’s no sugar, the flavour will be sour/bitter.

This would be perfect for those that like to buy plain yogurt because they want to avoid added sugars and other ingredients. You could make your own fruit powders using a dehydrator, or your oven on its lowest setting, and then just toss the dust into a salt shaker with some rice to help keep the moisture out and increase its shelf life (but you would probably want to store it in the fridge when not in use).

Yogurt Isn’t Always the Best Source of Probiotic Bacteria

As a parent with a background in science, I usually feel comfortable in the drugstore medicine aisle. I’ll stand there for 15 minutes comparing ingredients and prices, getting in every other parent’s way, and I’ll walk out feeling confident that what I have bought is a good value and will make my wee one feel at least a little bit better. Not so when I found myself faced with a daunting aisle of probiotics—live microorganisms that can confer health benefits—at my local health food store recently. I wanted to find some good bacteria to repopulate the gut of my toddler daughter, who was finishing up what seemed like her 80th dose of antibiotics in three months. I couldn’t even understand the labels, let alone fathom what I should buy. Did I want Lactobacillus GG? Bifidobacterium lactis? Lactobacillus acidophilus? What the hell were Lactobacillus anyway, and why does one small tub of them cost $28?

Source: Should Your Kids Take Probiotics?

Some aren’t aware that probiotics don’t take up residence, even in the best-case scenario. When you stop taking them, you stop getting whatever benefits they provided.

Make Dairy-Free Yogurt with Coconut Milk

After trying a pot of super creamy, slightly tangy coconut yogurt from the supermarket, I started to wonder how it was made — and if I could make it myself. A bit of research and experimentation later, I discovered it’s not hard at all! As soon as you’ve gathered a few supplies, you’ll be well on your way to making (and falling in love with) this delicious dairy-free yogurt.

Source: How to Make Dairy-Free Coconut Yogurt

FYI: Even reduced-fat coconut milk contains about 10 grams of saturated fat per 100 grams, compared to about 2.3 grams per 100 ml in reduced-fat cow’s milk.  But if you can’t have dairy…

Yogurt/Greek Yogurt: How Much Vitamin K?

If you’re reading this, you must not be lactose intolerant 😉

For 1 cup of yogurt (Greek or otherwise), there’s 0.5 mcg:

So, there is vitamin K.  If you regularly consume lots already while on blood thinners (warfarin, coumadin) then your dose should already take this into account.  A cup a day will not be a major impact.

  • Yogurt has recently been show to lower risk of type 2 diabetes in several large-scale human studies. While the greatest risk reduction has been shown in individuals who average about 6 ounces per day, even 3 ounces per day has been shown to decrease risk.
  • Probiotic yogurts (containing millions or tens of millions of live bacteria per gram of yogurt) have been found to decrease total blood cholesterol levels while increasing HDL (“good cholesterol”) levels when consuming 10 ounces a day.
  • 2 cups per week is associated with lowering hip fracture risk
  • Yogurt is known for decreased appetite (not surprising, given the protein-rich nature of this food), better immune system function, and better bone support.
  • Cancer: There’s only a decreased risk in bladder cancer when consuming yogurt.  2+ servings, but we don’t know what the size was…
  • Yogurt can be made from either animal or plant foods. Animal-based yogurts are often referred to as “dairy” yogurts and plant-based yogurts as “non-dairy” yogurts.

Not all Greek yogurt is made according to traditional fermentation and straining techniques. Due to the rapid growth in popularity of this yogurt type, some manufacturers are working to meet the marketplace need by taking tapioca or other thickeners and adding them to non-strained yogurt, together with supplemental protein in order to match the amount in traditionally strained Greek style yogurt. While these “no-strain” Greek style yogurts may match traditional Greek style yogurts in texture and protein content, these are considered to be a further step away from whole, natural food and recommend traditionally fermented and strained products when choosing Greek yogurt.

Yogurt’s Biggest Monster Is Being Deposed

If you hear lovers of delicious and nutritious yogurt exclaiming “Ding dong!” this morning, you may follow up by exclaiming “The witch is dead!” The king of inferior Greek yogurt has fallen from his curdled throne.

Chobani is to “Greek yogurt” as prison wine made from fermented orange juice is to “fine wine.” The company successfully passed off its watery, bitter product on the American public for years, and Chobani’s CEO, Hamdi Ulukaya, was riding high on a wave of money, and bad yogurt.

Source: Yogurt’s Biggest Monster Is Being Deposed–High Five

Apparently the author prefers Fage products…

Salt Isn’t Always the Enemy: 5 Cool Tricks

…though salt excels at bringing out the flavor in other ingredients (and even increases your perception of their aroma before you take a bite), it’s also delicious all on its own. Just make sure you have the right NaCl on hand: Maldon, kosher, or Celtic varieties have the large-size crystals and briny taste that make them especially good when you want to shine a spotlight on this tasty mineral.

Source: Salt Isn’t Always the Enemy: 5 Cool Tricks

Some are reading thinking “salt is just NaCl…”, how can there be different types?  Table salt has had iodine added to it for almost 100 years now to prevent gout – it was originally developed by the Swiss.  While it’s all sodium chloride, there’s additional elements in the compound to give distinct characteristics (a la sea salt).

Who’s Winning the Greek-Yogurt ‘Revolution’?

Chobani today leads all brands with 47.3% share of Greek in the U.S. But Dannon has come on strong of late, growing share from 15.2% a year ago to 19.7% share as of May, taking the No. 2 spot ahead of Fage, whose share fell from 19.1% to 13.9%, according to Bernstein estimates citing Nielsen data.

Source: Who’s Winning the Greek-Yogurt ‘Revolution’?

Digestive Problems? Try Fermented Foods

There is strong medical evidence available that suggests one of the simplest, most natural, and perhaps even most effective ways of dealing with digestive problems such as IBS, candida, acid reflux, Crohn’s Disease, and leaky gut could be fermented foods.

Source: How Fermented Foods Can Help Your Digestive Woes

Commercial yogurt in the US is made from pasteurized milk which is inoculated with a select variety of fermenting lactobaccilli, which I suspect is why the author poo-poos it – because it’s not the wild, all-natural, found on your fruits and vegetables wide variety of yeasts and bacteria you’d get elsewhere.

If you eat raw fruit and veg you probably get plenty of said raw, natural microbia. Ever notice that grapes appear to have a sorta dusty appearance ? That’s mostly yeast. Rinsing doesn’t remove most of them. Same for plums, cherries, cabbage, and most any other fruit or vegetable you can think of, it’s just more visible on red grapes. Eat raw fruit and vegetables as well as fermented food, and don’t worry so much about probiotics.