The Difference Between Various Kinds of Protein Supplements

Flip through any exercise magazine and, judging by all the attention protein supplements get, it appears protein and fitness somehow go hand-in-hand . And it is true: Protein can help promote a healthy weight and help muscles recover after a good workout. But what exactly is protein, and when it comes to supplements, which type of protein is best? Read on to learn about the different sources of protein powder and which ones stand apart from the rest.

Source: The Ultimate Guide to Protein Supplements

Because isolates are further processed to remove sugars (like lactose), carbs & fats so isolates are good for those who are lactose intolerant.  But pointless for everyone else, and does not digest faster.  Concentrates still have sugars, carbs, and fats. And typically taste better than isolates.

The article incorrectly states that lactose is indigestible for some, but it’s not because it’s an allergen. It is still an allergen, but the reason for it being indigestible is a lactose intolerance, not a milk allergy. Both casein & whey, regardless of concentrate or isolate form, are allergens.

Casein is grittier tasting compared to whey. Casein also takes longer to dissolve, and makes your shakes thicker compared to what an isolate would.

How to Count Macronutrients Instead of Calories for Better Diet Success

If you’ve ever read a fitness blog, forum, or even Instagram, you’ve probably heard the term macros thrown around. Short for “macronutrients,” it refers to carbs, fats, and proteins—the three basic components of every diet. If you get their proportions right, it makes dieting a lot more effective when simple calorie restriction fails.

Source: How to Count Macronutrients Instead of Calories for Better Diet Success

Protein: Timing, Type and Quality for Optimal Recovery

When it comes to protein type, timing and quantity, we see conflicting information regarding intake everywhere.

Recovery? Protein!

Weight loss? Protein!

Reduce blood sugar swings? Protein!

Body composition change? Protein! Protein! Protein!

But there’s much more to it than just eat more (or less) protein. In this month’s post, I’d like to focus on the athletic population (a way to state a disclaimer that the general population is different and has different nutritional needs).

Source: Physiology and Nutrition: Timing, Type and Quality of Protein Consumption for Optimal Recovery

If you like technical articles rooted in kinesiology, this is for you.  It’s brief, but covers a fair amount of ground.  Good read for the serious athlete.

The Chemistry Of Delicious, Delicious Meringues

Egg proteins change when you heat them, beat them, or mix them with other ingredients. Understanding these changes can help you grasp the many roles that eggs can play in the cooking process. Proteins are made of long chains of amino acids; in an egg white these are globular proteins which means that the long protein molecule is twisted, folded and curled up into a spherical shape. To keep the protein in that shape there is a variety of weak chemical bonds which keep the protein curled up tight as it drifts placidly in the water that surrounds it.

Source: The Chemistry of Egg Whites

Ah, sugared protein foam!  My favourite… 🙂