Upgrade Store-Bought Applesauce With a Bit of Maple Syrup

If you have no love for plain applesauce, don’t give up on it as a topping for latkes, a partner for seared pork chops, or even layered with Greek yogurt for a breakfast parfait. Instead, use one of these simple tweaks to transform that innocent apple flavor into something way more deliciously adult. Each of these strategies will upgrade one cup of unsweetened “natural” applesauce…

Source: How to Make Store-Bought Applesauce Taste Amazing

  • If you want a sauce that’s sweet and a bit sour, add a splash of apple cider vinegar in there too.  This combination is particularly tasty with a ham.
  • If concerned about already-sweetened/HFCS applesauce, use fake maple flavour.

Make This Digestive Tonic to Relieve the Pain of Holiday Overeating

Mint, ginger, fennel, and cayenne are known for their digestive properties. Turn this into a spritzer by using club soda instead of water.

Source: Overeater’s Tonic

Never tried anything remotely like this, nor do I know anyone who has used something like it beyond napping.  If necessary, I just take Tums antacid for heartburn…

Make Mushroom “Jerky” For an Umami-Packed Snack Anyone Can Enjoy

Not for those allergic to mushrooms, obviously 😉

These super salty, slightly tangy slices make a great addition to wraps, sandwiches, salads, and more. Keep them in your fridge for a quick snack or a means of adding intensity and umami to any dish!

Source: Vegan Mushroom “Jerky” (Slow-Roasted Mushroom Strips)

The recipe is similar to the this one for vegan smoked mushroom “bacon”, which is liable to be cheaper than the algae that tastes like bacon

Always cool to see what substitutions/alternatives people have come up with.  Traditional jerky uses meat, and has been suggested as a reasonable source of protein.  100 grams of beef jerky contains 33.2 grams of protein, and 2.3 mcg of vitamin K (3% Daily Value).  Grilled portobella mushroom has 5.2 grams of protein per 1 cup/121 grams, and no vitamin K.  Win some, lose some…

Relieve Itchy Mosquito Bites with Fresh Lemon or Lime Juice

Unwelcome critters, whether in your cabinets or on your tomato vines, are a common woe. We rounded up the best tips from the internet and tested them to see which actually work.

Source: Myth or Magic? 16 Pest Control Hacks We Tested for You

Direct sunlight on lime juice causes severe burning and blistering of the skin, which may require an ER visit. I won’t post gross pics but feel free to Google!  If you are applying lime juice to your skin, it should only be done if they are inside for the day.

Add Tang to Your Salsa with a Dash of Sherry Vinegar

I have at least five kinds of vinegar always in use at home, and one of my favorites is sherry, which is floral, not as acidic, and a bit subtler overall than other vinegars. Add a touch to rich sauces or, especially, to salsas and pico de gallo. Take any fruit like mango or pineapple, and toss it in a hot pan with onions and cilantro. Then drizzle it with olive oil and sherry vinegar and you have a perfect salsa.

Source: Hey Chef, What Else Can I Do With Vinegar?

Need a salsa recipe?  Try this one.

I admit, I didn’t know there was so much variety in vinegar.  Some of the suggestions for what to make using vinegar are rather interesting, but I think I’ll wait to try someone else’s vinegar gelato…

Foods to Reactivate Your Pineal Gland

There’s two articles – the second is a continuation of the first.

As we age the pineal gland begins to calcify and become sluggish. This rate varies considerably by person and lifestyle, but consuming excessive amounts of fluoride is considered to be a risk factor. This is partly because fluoride collects in extremely high amounts in the pineal gland causing faster calcification. Fluoride can also decrease melatonin production, two things we certainly don’t want to happen. Research has shown that this calcification of the pineal gland shows a strong correlation in the developing of Alzheimer’s disease (Mercola 2011). A poor diet laden with preservatives, chemicals, and pesticides are a major risk factor for calcification and premature aging as well.

What can we do to fight the aging process and calcification of the pineal gland? Eating a healthy, preservative/chemical free diet that is rich in healthy fats, should be a no-brainer (pun intended), but what else can we do?

Source:

Moldy Cheese: When to Keep, When Not To

Soft cheeses, such as cottage cheese, cream cheese and ricotta cheese, that have mold should be discarded. The same goes for any kind of cheese that’s shredded, crumbled or sliced.

…Mold generally can’t penetrate far into hard and semi-soft cheeses, such as cheddar, colby, Parmesan and Swiss. So you can cut away the moldy part and eat the rest of the cheese. Cut off at least 1 inch (2.5 centimeters) around and below the moldy spot. Be sure to keep the knife out of the mold so it doesn’t contaminate other parts of the cheese.

Of course, not all molds pose a risk. In fact, some types of mold are used to make cheeses, such as Brie and Camembert. These molds are safe to eat.

Source: If a piece of cheese has mold growing on it, should I throw the cheese away?

If unsure, be safe & throw it out.

Sometimes you can cut the mold off, but you can prevent the mold by moistening paper towel with vinegar – apple cider or white, doesn’t matter.  It’s not enough to taint the flavour.  But it’s a good idea to let the cheese stand to air for a couple of minutes before consuming.