Your Stubbornness Is the Real Reason You Aren’t Losing Weight

I’ve seen thousands of people attempt a weight loss regimen, and there is one common trait shared by people who fail fast. It’s not bad genetics, lack of time, or a penchant for fine wines. It’s stubbornness.

Source: Your Stubbornness Is the Real Reason You Aren’t Losing Weight

I don’t put much effort into dealing with stubbornness.  I recently sent “I did it my way” (a la Frank Sinatra) to a co-worker because they dismissed my suggestions about their constant failing at dealing with a professional relationship.  Most often, it’s best left to stubborn people to let them learn for themselves.  Flipside, it’s a mark of a pretty crappy person who will not attempt to get involved while enjoying the drama that unfolds…

Reminding People of the Dangers of Diseases Boosts Vaccine Acceptance

The US has seen an increasing number of outbreaks from some communicable diseases that can easily be controlled through vaccination, but there has been a parallel increase in the number of parents who are choosing not to vaccinate their children. In part because there are a lot of reasons that the vaccination rate is dropping (unfounded fears about vaccine safety and mistrust of pharmaceutical companies are two), it’s not clear that a single intervention will reverse this trend.

A pair of papers released this week looked at two very different approaches, one focused on individuals and a second at state-level laws. They show that it’s relatively simple to change both attitudes and actions on vaccination.

Source: Reminding people of the dangers of diseases boosts vaccine acceptance

I’ve always been seriously aggravated by the anti-vaccination groups. This is a classic example of the prisoner’s dilemma or similar game theories. Society as a whole loses out because these people believe bunk science.

Although… to be a prisoner’s dilemma there would technically have to be a winning position gained by not getting vaccinated and a loser’s outcome for getting vaccinated. Since there’s not, I guess these people are just dicks then:

You’re reading it in my voice, aren’t you?

Cycling: 8 Ways to Become a Better Climber

Climbing. Some love it, some hate it. More often than not a rider’s attitude towards climbing correlates with their bodyweight. The bottom line is that climbing is generally dictated by watts per kilo. Simply put: to climb faster, you need to put out more power, or weigh less. Or both.

There are a myriad of strategies that can be enacted with coaches, physiologists and nutritionists until you’re light and strong enough to leave all your mates behind. But bike races are not raced in a lab.

It’s a curious observation that those who test well in the lab often get smashed by their less-impressive counterparts in real-life racing. Sometimes it’s attitude, sometimes its technique, sometimes it’s pacing. But whatever is letting you down, here are a few tips to help you improve.

Source: 8 ways to become a better climber

Being at the front is a tip I’ve gotten for group rides too.  The rationale is that stronger climbers will pass you, but hopefully you won’t fall to the very back – so you’ll still crest the hill with the majority of the group.

Being in or out of the saddle, all that matters is that you are comfortable.  I was given a “tip” once that if everyone else is out of the saddle – you should be too.  I disregarded the tip, and have since found the following video:

The science says there’s no difference (same as the article), even if the standing test was done so the guy wasn’t standing the entire time.  What really dictates getting out of the saddle is how steep the climb is – you need to get out of the saddle to keep the weight distribution between the front and rear wheel.  Too much in the back, the front lifts and you could end up on the ground.  Too much in the front, and you loose traction in the rear – spin out.  Spinning out isn’t that much of an issue on pavement/asphalt, but when the terrain is loose (gravel, dirt, mud) – it’s a lot more likely, and a lot more obvious.

Listening to the breathing of the people around you is very much a thing.  In a group ride, it’s a courtesy to the person you’re paired with so you know if you should back off the pace.  But as the article points out – in a competitive setting, use that to your advantage.  Which leads into the next point…

As with any competition, knowing your opponent is key.  Know when your opponent is “riding the rivet” so you can push them beyond the breaking point.  I’ve had the experience where people misread me, because I am an unorthodox cyclist – I push big gears, low cadence.  I get a lot of sneers, and it takes a few rides before that goes away.

What Happened to the Runner Who Soiled Himself During a Half Marathon?

Years after Swedish distance runner Mikael Ekvall crapped his shorts in the midst of a half-marathon, his photo still shows up on Facebook. You might’ve seen it with a “fail” caption or a demotivational poster—played-out viral image formats that were de rigueur at the time—or in any number of “world’s most embarrassing photos” compilations. Clearly, people still haven’t gotten over Ekvall’s uncomfortable grimace and the liquified shit trickling down his legs.

Source: What Happened to the Runner Who Shit Himself During a Half-Marathon?

Paula Radcliffe stopped on the course and dropped a deuce en route to winning the 2005 London marathon.  She didn’t get it all over herself like this poor gentleman, but it did happen in view of the fans and on live TV.  Greg LeMond had the same thing happen during a Tour de France stage in ’89. He won that stage. And the whole Tour.

To the uninitiated it may be gross, but to those in the know there is a quiet respect, an understanding, and the attitude about not quitting once is what defines winners.