The Key to Perfectly Cheesy, Melty Omelettes

Here’s a perennial omelette problem: You want the cheese in the center to be warm and melted, but by the time the cheese melts, the eggs are overcooked. Conversely, you can have perfectly tender curds of egg, but barely melted cheese. What’s the solution?

The trick is to give the cheese a head start in melting by mixing it with hot ingredients.

Source: The Food Lab: A Quick Guide to Stuffing Omelettes

I’ll try this, but the best thing I ever did was learn how to make an omelette, French style, from old Julia Child videos on YouTube:

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Store Leftover Frying Oil in the Freezer

Don’t think of your freezer as nothing more than cold storage space: You can use it as an essential kitchen tool.

Source: 6 surprising foods you should keep in the freezer

That’ll make your ice cream tasty…  Chocolate chip mint with a hint of onion rings and fish sticks.

There’s No Such Thing As ‘Good Cholesterol’ Says Pivotal New Study

A surprising new genetic study shows that some people with naturally high levels of HDL cholesterol—the supposedly good kind of cholesterol—are at increased risk of a heart attack. Doctors are now further questioning the use of drugs to boost HDL levels while looking to new therapies to reduce heart risk.

Source: There’s No Such Thing As ‘Good Cholesterol’ Says Pivotal New Study

Sorry for the scare.

For the people with this genetic defect, HDL (“good”) cholesterol is not good because the defect destroys their liver’s ability to absorb fat brought to it by HDL.  In normal people, HDL still correlates with lower risk of heart disease.

Upgrade a Batch of Chili With Cinnamon, Cocoa, or Even Coffee

Chili is personal, and you have your favorite recipe. I respect that. I’m not here to argue with your one true chili love.

But I would bet that there are some ways that you could make your tried-and-true recipe even better. I’m just talking about little things to add extra flavor here or give some richness there—small tweaks that, when tallied up, amount to a more fantastic chili.

Source: 10 Ways to Make Your Favorite Chili Recipe Even Better

Some will think cinnamon in chili is an abomination. And I like cinnamon. In ice cream. On apples. In chewing gum. But in chili?  It’s worth an experiment – cinnamon can do some interesting things in more savory dishes.

Your Super Lazy Guide to Making Super Bowl Party Food

In a culture where party food is practically a competitive sport, it can be easy to overthink your Super Bowl snack options. Unsurprisingly, we recommend taking a lazier approach, and have culled some the tastiest, minimum-effort dips and finger foods around, so you can focus on what’s really important: football.

Source: Your Super Lazy Guide to Making Super Bowl Party Food

Don’t forget the guacamole!

The 20 Best Full-Fat Foods for Weight Loss

…now I can get fat 😀

It’s time to get fat.

Not around your waist, but on your plate: A new report from the Credit Suisse Research Institute found that more and more of us are choosing whole-fat foods over skim, lite, fat-free or other modern monikers of leanness. And while many health organizations like the American Heart Association still want us to cut down on fat—particularly saturated fat—this full-fat trend may be a healthy rebellion against those decades-old credos, according to recent studies.

Source: The 20 Best Full-Fat Foods for Weight Loss

The article fails to mention why fat is good in our diet: fat soluble vitamin uptake is greatly improved when consumed with fat.  So I don’t know why they listed protein as something that is improved by eating fat…

Be mindful of how much vitamin K there is in the suggested foods:

There Is Now Nutrient-Rich Algae That Tastes Just Like Bacon, Because Science

This has been something that had been going around word-of-mouth for months…

The Pacific Northwest gives us lots of great consumables: Harry and David pears and wine that’ll help you burn fat among them. And now scientists at Oregon State University have developed an algae that reportedly tastes like pork belly.

Source: There Is Now Nutrient-Rich Algae That Tastes Just Like Bacon, Because Science

The article contains a link to a website (maine seaweed) from which you can purchase a similar product. it costs $32/lb + $15 for shipping.  According to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, the average price of sliced bacon in august 2015 was $5.41 per pound in US cities, and $4.78 per pound in the Midwest.  That’s just a function of pricing a new product with no scale.  But how many vegetarian/vegan alternatives do you know of that retail for less than their mainstream counterpart?  Meat production is also heavily subsidized, which reduces the price drastically.

Vitamin loaded, fat free, basically calorie free, good protein/calorie ratio bacon?  First, the article is clear that already available dulce is not bacon flavoured.  Second, what I can’t currently find is remotely definitive nutritional data on dulce… which likely can’t be assumed against this engineered strain of dulce.  Going on the article comparing the nutritional value of kale, I’m worried that the vitamin K content is a concern.  But for most other types of seaweed, vitamin K is present (but not much).

Make a Can of Beans into a Meal with These Flavor-Packed Additions

…being okay with canned baked beans doesn’t mean they can’t be improved. In fact, canned baked beans are dying to be riffed on. We like to do the seasoning ourselves, starting out with a can of original recipe (or the most basic variety of your favorite brand of baked beans). From a dash of spice to fresh diced vegetables, the options are literally endless.

Here are a few stir-in ideas to get your backyard barbecue feast started…

Source: Five Ways to Update Canned Baked Beans

Bean-based soups and stews are also really high in protein and endlessly versatile. I made a vegetarian soup this week with chipotles in adobo, garlic, peppers, onion, and quinoa. A can of beans + whatever you have in the house is likely to be a life-saver!

The Myth of High-Protein Diets

MANY people have been making the case that Americans have grown fat because they eat too much starch and sugar, and not enough meat, fat and eggs. Recently, the Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee lifted recommendations that consumption of dietary cholesterol should be restricted, citing research that dietary cholesterol does not have a major effect on blood cholesterol levels. The predictable headlines followed: “Back to Eggs and Bacon?”

Source: The Myth of High-Protein Diets

These are not controlled studies.  While controlled studies provide better evidence, they are not feasible for all questions (in this case it would be impractical and unethical).  Results from observational studies like this one are not invalid, you just need to consider potential confounding, as they seem to have done here.  The study itself says that substituting fish, poultry, and nuts for red meat lowered the mortality risk.

This is no surprise coming from Dr. Dean Ornish, a longtime advocate of eating a plant-based diet. But his phrasing here surprises me. He seems to be suggesting that high protein in and of itself is bad, even if you’re getting your protein from low-calorie, low-fat sources like salmon.

Processed meats are so tightly linked to diabetes that we can inject rats with a compound from meat and cause diabetes. However, this is just processed meats we’re talking about. If you just cut some raw meat and then cook it, you’re mostly fine.

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