Use Chickpea Liquid to Make the Fluffiest Egg-Free Pancakes Ever

Recipes and techniques generally advance in baby steps. It’s rare that you find a technique so far out of left field that it changes the way people think about food overnight. Sous vide cooking is up there, as is no-knead bread. In the world of vegan cuisine, nothing has shaken things up like aquafaba—the recently coined term for the liquid inside a can of cooked beans. It’s the kind of technique that’s so mind-blowingly simple that I’m amazed nobody discovered it until just a couple of years ago.

Source: Use Aquafaba to Make Extra-Light, Fluffy Egg-Free or Vegan Pancakes

I discovered aquafaba with a recipe for two ingredient meringues a few months ago. It has since nearly completely replaced my use of prepackaged egg substitutes. I am eating a lot more chickpeas now as a result. I’ve also found that canned chickpeas freeze well and defrost quickly.

Make Delicious Vegan Waffles With Tofu Instead of Eggs

As controversial as sneaking healthy ingredients into junky kid-foods may be (I’ve been known to throw stones myself), parents need to do what they need to do. And, in at least this one case, doing the unthinkable in the name of health led to a totally genius result.

The unthinkable? Emptying an entire package of tofu into the waffle batter.

Source: Genius Crispy, Fluffy (Vegan) Waffles with a Very Strange Secret Ingredient

Sugar in a vegan recipe?!  I could just waffle on and on… 😉

I don’t get why haters are so quick to point out that things don’t taste identical to their non-vegan/etc counterpart.  Besides the ideological aspect, the health aspect is valid.  And lots of recipes we use today came from people experimenting on existing recipes.  Though, I do wonder if chasing foods deemed no longer acceptable leads to the semi-vegetarianism that’s been reported in the past

Make Peanut Butter and Chocolate Chip Cookies in Under 3 Minutes in the Microwave

I adjusted the recipe just a bit, didn’t have chocolate chips but grated some butterfinger bites into it and instead of a microwave used my waffle iron. Let cool a little, and they were prefect (and no waste).

Make Your Own Self-Rising Flour with Stuff You Already Have in Your Kitchen

All-purpose flour is a pantry essential. You’re reliant on it for chocolate chip cookies and your favorite Sunday morning pancakes. But every once in awhile you may come across a baking recipe that calls for cake flour or self-rising flour. Rather than pick up a bag, make these varieties at home with what you already have on hand. Yup, we just saved you a trip to the grocery store

Source: Flour Hacks: Make Your Own Cake or Self-Rising Flour

Don’t forget to sift!

Cream of Tartar: How Much Vitamin K?

If you were concerned, don’t be.  Potassium bitartrate (AKA cream of tartar) has no vitamin K.  2 – 100 grams, no vitamin K.

How is it made?   According to Wikipedia (defaced it myself):

Potassium bitartrate crystallizes in wine casks during the fermentation of grapejuice, and can precipitate out of wine in bottles.

In food, potassium bitartrate is used for:

  • Stabilizing egg whites, increasing their heat tolerance and volume
  • Stabilizing whipped cream, maintaining its texture and volume
  • Anti-caking and thickening
  • Preventing sugar syrups from crystallizing
  • Reducing discoloration of boiled vegetables

Additionally it is used as a component of:

  • Baking powder, as an acid ingredient to activate baking soda
  • Sodium-free salt substitutes, in combination with potassium chloride

Cake Chemists: See the Results When Missing Ingredients

What happens if you miss a vital ingredient out of a cake? Why is the egg so important? What does baking powder actually do? Join Nerys and David of the Live Science Team as they investigate the chemistry of cakes & show you a tasty experiment to try in your own laboratory/kitchen!

See the Youtube video (3:54 minutes).  The recipe they use is in the video details, so you can repeat their experiment.

This for That: Cooking & Baking Substitutes

Direct link to infographic.

Some stuff seems OK – it breaks out the component ingredients for things that are frequently bought as a combination, like poultry seasoning. The rest, though? They are not even close and would produce an entirely different thing in a lot of cases.  But then, that’s typically the challenge when trying to “veganize” and/or make a recipe gluten free for example.

…or you could just buy the actual ingredients 😉