Mix Italian Dressing with Barbecue Sauce for the Perfect Marinade for Any Meat

My father never cooked a meat without some kind of marinade. He always used a slew of ingredients: salt, pepper, Season-All, Cajun seasoning, vinegar, olive oil, liquid smoke, Worcestershire, hot sauce, onions, lemons… I’m pretty sure this isn’t a complete list, but I’ve honestly forgotten the rest! It always tasted amazing, but the long list of ingredients was definitely a detriment whenever replicating the marinade.

One day, we were out of vinegar and he asked me to grab some Italian dressing instead; I was surprised when I couldn’t taste the difference despite the substitution. The same thing happened when he substituted barbecue sauce instead of liquid smoke… and that’s when the wheels in my head started turning. Using these two ingredients, I would be able to create something close to my father’s famous marinade—with far less hassle and only two ingredients!

Source: These Two Items Make the Only Meat Marinade You’ll Ever Need

The easiest way in the world to bake chicken is literally just put the chicken in a pyrex, dump a bunch of Italian dressing on it, and put it in the oven.

I was dubious about how this could work for so many types of meat, but the article explains the different marinating ratios. I’ll have to try this at my next cookout, which should be soon given the fair weather we’ve been having.

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BBQ Sauce: How Much Vitamin K?

Unlike ketchup, BBQ sauce could really be anywhere on the map.  Lots I know who do BBQ tend to make their own BBQ sauce.  So – take the following with a grain of salt? 😉

BBQ sauce supposedly contains the following amount of vitamin K:

  • 1 cup/240 mg: 4.5 mcg, or 6% Daily Value (DV)
  • 100 grams: 1.8 mcg, 2% DV
  • 2 tablespoons/35 grams: 0.6 mcg, 1% DV

Like ketchup, you can see that the dose can ramp up quickly if you aren’t careful about the volume you eat.  Be aware that BBQ sauce does have vitamin A, vitamin C, calcium, iron, riboflavin, naicin, folate…  However it is high in sodium and sugar.

…but it takes so good.

Exactly How Many People Will Get Cancer From Soda?

The amount of soda you sip not only boosts your sugar intake and packs on pounds—it might also increase your risk for cancer.

The culprit? A chemical called 4-methylimidazole (4-MeI). This potential carcinogen is found in some types of caramel color, the artificial ingredient used to turn colas and other soft drinks brown. Every day, more than half of Americans between the ages of 6 and 64 typically drink soda in amounts that could expose them to enough 4-MeI to increase their cancer risk, according to a new analysis of national soda consumption conducted by scientists at Consumer Reports and the Center for a Livable Future at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. The study was published today in the scientific online journal PLOS ONE.

…caramel color is found in a wide variety of foods, including bread and other baked goods, dark sauces such as soy or barbecue, pancake syrup, and soups. While we don’t know what type of caramel color or how much 4-MeI is in those foods, it’s clear that many people are already getting concerning amounts of 4-MeI in their diets just from the soda they drink.

Source: Another reason to cut back on soda

Ideally, this carcinogenic chemical should not be added to food on purpose because we know that will cause dozens or possibly thousands of cancer deaths in the coming decades. But what are you gonna drink—Sprite?