What’s the Fastest Way to Chill a Can of Beer?

There’s nothing like cracking a cold beer on a hot summer day, but what if your six-pack isn’t chilled? You’ve got to find a way to get those brews frosty, lest you face the horror of a lukewarm libation. That’s why we’re trying a couple methods to cool your beer quickly.

Source: What’s the Fastest Way to Chill a Can of Beer?

Part of what is needed for the towel (though it may need more time too) is air circulation.

If the air cannot move around the towel, it won’t be able to chill the towel and contents of the can. The can keeps the towel warm enough to stay floppy. It is similar to the non-electric freezers that can get cold enough to freeze water in the middle of summer heat.  Short summary, you take a sealed vessel to hold whatever needs to be chilled/frozen, surround it with a porous material that can hold moisture (soil works well), then place all that in a container that can allow the air move freely over most of the surface. Provided the moisture remains, all that heat will get sucked out by the water.

Why would adding salt to the ice bath accelerate cooling of the beer?

Freezing water is around 0° C, but freezing salt-water can go as low as -21° C. In early experiments, Gabriel Fahrenheit was able to get freezing salt water down to about -18 C, or what he called 0° F.

Side note: Fahrenheit soon realized that freezing salt water and blood made lousy reference points (cough Celsius cough) and ended up using freezing and boiling water.

This Video Debunks 10 Misconceptions About Your Favorite Beverages

To be clear – tap water is more heavily regulated than bottled water, and the presenter makes sure to say that the actual water quality depends on location (obviously Flint and WV are outliers).

Choose Thicker Beverages to Help Suppress Hunger

Ever notice how you tend to feel fuller from a thick fruit smoothie than from straight fruit juice? It’s not your imagination; the thickness and viscosity of a beverage can greatly influence your levels of satiety, or feelings of fullness, and help suppress hunger.

Source: Choose Thicker Beverages to Help Suppress Hunger

I noticed this when I switched from mayonnaise in my tuna sandwich to using guacamole.  I’d feel full/satisfied for at least an hour more when I used the guacamole, aside from better health/nutrition.  People see my sandwich, wonder if I ground up the Hulk…

When It Makes Sense to Add Extra Fat to Your Meal

Now that fat is overcoming its bad reputation, it’s becoming trendy to add it to food and drinks for health reasons—whether that’s putting butter in your coffee for dubious benefits, or swapping “Lite” salad dressing for a drizzle of bacon grease. But when does adding fat make sense, and when is it a bad idea?

Source: When It Makes Sense to Add Extra Fat to Your Meal

I was glad to see the article talk about how we’ve come to know that fat intake increases our uptake of fat soluble vitamins.  There is most certainly nutritional value in having fat in our diet.

Timeline: How Our Sodas Got So Huge

When McDonald’s execs first struck up their lucrative business partnership with the Coca-Cola Company in 1955, they were thinking small—literally. At the time, the only size of the beverage available for purchase was a measly 7-ounce cup. But by 1994, America’s classic burger joint was offering a fountain drink size six times bigger.

Source: Too Big to Chug: How Our Sodas Got So Huge