Creative and Delicious Ways to Repurpose “Extra” Easter Candy

Easter has passed and the bunny has come and gone, but the candy remains. You may have some leftovers, or you may—in your infinite wisdom—have hit up the clearance aisle to stock up on peanut butter eggs and hollow chocolate rabbits. Either way, here are some of the most delicious things you can do with your sweet haul besides just eating it.

Source: Creative and Delicious Ways to Repurpose “Extra” Easter Candy

Smores using a Cadbury Creme Egg and a Peep… 😀

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The Secret to Amazing Tomato-Based Sauce: Roasting It In the Oven

It starts the usual way sauces do—sauté onion and garlic, add some chile flakes, then booze, then tomatoes, but then it swerves off course. Here’s the secret to its success: You take this perfectly adequate sauce and roast it in the oven for an hour and a half.

Source: A Genius Technique for the Best Vodka Pasta (And Better Marinara, Too)

I sometimes start my sauce by caramelizing my tomato paste in olive oil over the heat, then deglazing that with about 1/4 bottle of red wine. The sweet caramelized tomato paste/wine combo makes things really punchy in the end, even through a long simmer.

Cooking: Doesn’t ‘Burn Off’ The Alcohol In Food

If you’re worried about getting boozy in front of your fiancée’s parents over the holidays, it’s not just the eggnog you should be watching.

As it turns out, many popular foods prepared with wine or liquor never have the alcohol completely cooked out. New Scientist deputy editor Graham Lawton tried it out for himself by eating several dishes sautéed, flambéed, or baked with booze. After each plate he consumed (an appetizer, a main course, and a dessert), Lawton measured his blood alcohol content.

Source: Cooking Doesn’t Actually ‘Burn Off’ The Alcohol In Food

There’s a handy chart in the article to compare how much alcohol content is retained in certain foods using various cooking times and methods.  A previous post covers non-alcoholic substitutions.