Learn What All Those Confusing Whiskey Label Terms Mean With This Guide

Ideally you want to get into a whiskey bottle, not spend all your time reading it like a cereal box. But to ensure you actually like what you buy, it’s probably a good idea to know how to decode a label. We won’t get into the nuance of all aspects here—whiskey subjects, if you’ve dabbled into them at all, tend to inspire some serious exegesis—but we can help guide you down the whiskey (whisky) aisle with a few key terms and basic definitions.

Source: How to Decode Any Whisk(e)y Label

Correction: Single Malt means that the whiskey came from a single batch of malt rather than from several that were blended. Think of a single origin coffee or single varietal wine versus a blend.

Blended whiskeys tend to be less expensive and more consistent on the flavor because the distillers can make up for weaknesses in one malt with strengths from another.

Single malt whiskeys tend to be more expensive, in part, due to the time and care it takes to get good results from just using one malt instead of blending. You’re also much more likely to get distinct flavors from a single malt (some are peaty, some are smokey, some are floral, some taste of vanilla).

This DIY Bourbon Concoction Will Soothe Your Scratchy Throat

It seems like winter colds strike with a vengeance right now, at the end of the season. In my household we drink literally gallons of ginger and honey tea during the cold months. Fresh ginger tea is delicious, and it wards off colds pretty well. But when I was felled last week by a particularly nasty cough, I had to turn to something stronger.

Source: Recipe: Bourbon Cough Syrup for Grownups

In Ireland, it’s called a “hot whiskey”, but undiluted with boiling water.   In Canada/US, it’s known as “hot toddy” (or “hot totty”).

Or you can try the Greek way:

  • true Greek yogurt, with thyme honey, and cinnamon
  • Longly boiled black tea, with thyme honey, lots of fresh lemon juice and a shot of whisky if you like it.

You can add ginger to any of these, but I recommend reading about the vitamin K content in ginger first.

The Best Way to Bake Your Pies Isn’t With Vodka—It’s Like This

We’ve entered pie season—and with that also comes the season of people telling you their secret pie crust ingredient. For most people, that secret ingredient means one thing: vodka. I know because I used to be one of them. Until I found something much, much better.

Source: The Best Way to Bake Your Pies Isn’t With Vodka—It’s Like This

One of the store I shop at sells vanilla vodka, so I use that in the crusts. It adds that extra bit. But it seems to me that the best crusts have a long flake to them that you get from hand-mixing. The vodka crust is flaky but crumbly, like cheesecake crust. Still, I’m glad the vodka crust is so reliable.

I have a pie crust recipe that doesn’t use any alcohol, including vanilla extract.  It’s served me well.

Easy, Boozy, Beautiful: Alcohol-Soaked Fruit Recipes To Serve This Summer

Sipping on a cocktail is so last season. This summer, instead, serve alcohol in the form of macerated fruit or frozen desserts. Who says you can’t have your cocktail and eat it, too?

Source: Easy, Boozy, Beautiful: Alcohol-Soaked Fruit Recipes To Serve This Summer

I could really go for some bourbon poached peaches…

Cooking: Non-Alcoholic Substitutes for Alcohol in Recipes

[The] following is a general list of non-alcoholic substitutes that can be used when cooking with alcohol is simply not an option. Choose the option that best matches the flavor of the dish you are making

Source: Alcohol Substitutions in Cooking

Worth taking a look at if you or someone you know needs to avoid alcohol but retain the flavour and enjoyment.  That doesn’t mean just alcoholics – expecting mothers?