Make These Grilled Cheese Roll-Ups for Easy Snacking or Soup Dipping

It’s not easy …being cheesy 😉

Guys, it’s finally here – it’s National Grilled Cheese Month!

Yes, it’s the best month of the year. And to celebrate, I share with you my absolute favorite and easiest grilled cheese recipe of all time.

Source: Grilled Cheese Roll Ups

Tomato soup, like all soups, exists only as a base for stews. That is all.

Can You Clean a Slow Cooker With a Dryer Sheet?

Sometimes you need any help you can get when the remnants of last night’s dinner refuse to part with the dirty dishes. But rest easy, weary scrubber: your cleaning methods can find a little extra oomph in unexpected places. Today we’re trying out a few cleaning tips that might save you time, if not sanity.

Source: Can You Clean a Slow Cooker With a Dryer Sheet?

Nooooo don’t put random household substances on your fancy metals! Buy a bottle of Brasso (liquid, use your own sponge/rag/etc) or a tin of “wadding” polish (it’s a can of dense woolly fluff soaked with cleaner — pull off a small tuft and use until it turns black, then grab another one). Both work well on unlacquered brass, copper, stainless steel, pewter, and similar alloys (they say you can use the Wilton Armetale polish on sterling, but I personally wouldn’t — Goddard’s works a treat and smells glorious).

Putting random acids on your metal holloware or utensils is a good way to ruin or even strip the finish, especially if they’re plated rather than solid.

Source : someone who inherited a whole mess of early 70s sand-cast Armetale dinner plates and serving pieces and fucking goblets, as well as a whole mess of sterling flatware and holloware and had no idea wtf to do with it.

Also, I bet a Mr Clean Magic Eraser would strip the baked-on gunk out of that slow cooker in a flash. But then a Magic Eraser works on damn near everything.

Use Up Stale Bread by Making This Classic, Hearty Soup

Soup is often hailed as the antidote to cold weather. But when winter really kicks in, brothy soups won’t suffice. Something with staying power, a little more stick-to-your-ribs goodness, is the trick to surviving winter. That’s why thickened, creamier soups win.

But you don’t need to add heavy cream or make a roux to achieve soups like this. All you need is some bread. All you’ve got is old and stale bread? Even better.

Source: Bread Is the Secret to Thicker, Heartier Soups

It’s the Flour, Not Just The Yeast, That Makes for Perfect Bread

Why do some wheat dough balls rise well and bake into perfect loaves while others are flat and hard as a brick? A new study says it’s as much about the flour as the yeast.

Source: It’s the Flour, Not Just The Yeast, That Makes for Perfect Bread

What about the water?  J. Kenji López-Alt from SeriousEats (and previously Cook’s Illustrated) wrote about performing a test concerning the effects of water on pizza crust.  They used multiple bottled waters, with different levels of dissolved solids as well as NYC tap water in the introduction of his new book. His panel of judges weren’t able to detect a significant difference between any of the crusts made with the different waters. At this point, I think it’s safe to say this is a myth or at least a very large degree of self-induced bias.

Use Your Spiralizer to Make Beautiful Crispy Potato Pancakes

Whether you’re on board or not, the spiralizing trend has taken off—and it’s rocketing to bacon-level heights. For those of you who have been living under a rock, a Spiralizer is a kitchen gadget—ranging from $15 to $50—that functions similarly to a large pencil sharpener, by cutting fruits and vegetables into long, curling faux-noodles. Pasta is the enemy of hard-core spiralizers; they specialize in creating curly vegetable alternatives. However, if you’re like me and need a little more convincing before buying one, here are five ways to use your Spiralizer beyond the standard vegetables-for-spaghetti swap.

Source: 5 Creative Ways to Use Your Spiralizer

Related: Spiralizer 101

Prevent Soggy or Burnt French Toast by Frying in Oil Instead of Butter

A plate of perfect French toast—crispy round the edges, custardy in the center, and capped off with an amber kiss of maple syrup—is a thing of breakfast time beauty. On the other hand, slices that turn out soggy and squishy, charred in some spots and undercooked in others… well, there’s nothing sadder. What could go wrong? We’ve identified five common French toast mistakes and how to fix them.

Source: You’ve Been Making French Toast All Wrong (Here’s How to Do It Right)

To get the best of both worlds – the smoke point of butter is lower, but yields more flavour and colours the food more quickly, often burning.  So heat a little oil, then add some butter…  You get the benefits of more colour and flavour from the butter, and get a slightly higher smoke point than if using just butter which is more likely to avoid burning yet still allowing for crispy non soggy toast. This method works well for many things, particularly fish.

Make Any Tapenade With This Simple Formula

Enter tapenade. If you’re familiar only with the kind that comes in the small jar from the supermarket, you’re missing out. The time saved may seem to compensate for the less-than-ideal flavor, but you can make make a much better version at home in under 30 minutes. Here’s how:

Source: How to Make Tapenade Without a Recipe

There’s 1.4 mcg of vitamin K in 100 grams of olives, and the recipe calls for 2 cups (~360 grams).  That’s ~5 mcg of vitamin K…  Capers on the other hand contain 24.6 mcg of vitamin k per 100 grams.

Keeping in mind that the vitamin K dose is quoted on consuming all of the tapenade.  I’m not judging… 😉

On a more serious note, I would not recommend eating tapenade before an INR test.  If there’s a long enough interval between tests (1 month), then I’d suggest tapenade soon after getting tested so you have time for your INR level to recover in an effort to not have to adjust your medication dose.

Bread, Ice Cream Is A Foam. Yes, Really.

It is, because foam, essentially, is air bubbles trapped in different phases. The foam on top of a beer—those are air bubbles surrounded by liquid. When you churn an ice cream mix, you are driving air bubbles into it. And then the mix freezes and you end up with a bunch of bubbles inside a solid matrix. The same is true of bread.

Source: What is Gluten?

It’s a slice of food science, but it neglects to mention that there are gluten free breads – sourdough, focaccia…

10 Food Staples You Can Make Better and Cheaper at Home

Many simple foods are not only easy to make at home, they’ll likely be cheaper, healthier, and much tastier than the store-bought varieties. From cheese to peanut butter, here are a few DIY, delicious food projects.

Source: Top 10 Food Staples You Can Make Better and Cheaper at Home

They forgot about tahini, but did mention nut butters.