Use Chickpea Liquid to Make the Fluffiest Egg-Free Pancakes Ever

Recipes and techniques generally advance in baby steps. It’s rare that you find a technique so far out of left field that it changes the way people think about food overnight. Sous vide cooking is up there, as is no-knead bread. In the world of vegan cuisine, nothing has shaken things up like aquafaba—the recently coined term for the liquid inside a can of cooked beans. It’s the kind of technique that’s so mind-blowingly simple that I’m amazed nobody discovered it until just a couple of years ago.

Source: Use Aquafaba to Make Extra-Light, Fluffy Egg-Free or Vegan Pancakes

I discovered aquafaba with a recipe for two ingredient meringues a few months ago. It has since nearly completely replaced my use of prepackaged egg substitutes. I am eating a lot more chickpeas now as a result. I’ve also found that canned chickpeas freeze well and defrost quickly.

Advertisements

Use Up Souring Milk by Making Pancakes and Waffles With It

One man’s trash is another man’s treasure.

As we show in the video above, this is what chef Dan Barber demonstrated earlier this year, when he temporarily turned Blue Hill, his Michelin-starred restaurant in New York City, into an incubator for garbage-to-plate dining.

Barber’s intent was to raise awareness about the vast issue of food waste. As we’ve reported, an estimated 133 billion pounds of food is wasted in the U.S. each year. The typical American family tosses out about $1,500 of food yearly.

Source: Don’t Toss That Sour Milk! And Other Tips to Cut Kitchen Food Waste

Pasteurized milk doesn’t sour – it putrefies. Only raw milk will sour and not many people can even get that anymore. Any milk sold at the grocery store is pasteurized…  Alternately, you can make something like clabbered milk by adding a little bit of acid to your milk – lemon juice or white vinegar both work.  This tip also works for Russian style crepes (blini).

I don’t know that “garbage to plate” is the best way to sell this to people.  I think everybody can enjoy tips like this to make use of things considered waste that really aren’t.

Add Seltzer to Your Batter for the Fluffiest Waffles of Your Life

Waffles are just pancakes with abs 😉

Our recipe for crisp, fluffy buttermilk waffles starts with replacing some of the buttermilk with a combination of powdered buttermilk and seltzer, which inflates the batter. Adding some baking soda to the recipe gave us buttermilk waffles that were perfectly browned. Using oil in the batter instead of butter kept the buttermilk waffles crispy because the oil’s fat repelled whatever interior moisture managed to rise to the surface of the waffle to soften the dry crust.

Source: Best Buttermilk Waffles

One thing to keep in mind: make sure you use actual seltzer or club soda, not sparkling water. La Croix may be the best known cure for Diet Coke addiction, but Cook’s Illustrated warns that it’s just not bubbly enough for this application.

Add Tahini to Make Any Sauce or Dip Creamier

A dish’s creamy base layer can keep you going back to foods again and again. Creamy is the secret behind so many of those most craveable foods—the ones we can’t quite put our finger on why we love so much.

And while you can achieve the creamy factor by, yes, adding a bit of cream, there’s more than one way to skin this textural cat. So here we list of our favorite ingredients that add a silky slow jam to just about anything you want to make.

Source: 7 Ways to Make Everything You Cook Deliciously Creamy

Tahini is easy to make yourself.  Alternately, one could use sodium citrate for creamy cheese

Five Simple Buttermilk Substitutions for Batters and Baked Goods

Maybe you don’t want to buy buttermilk for a recipe that calls for just half a cup of it, or maybe you’ve already started cooking and just realized you need buttermilk and don’t have any. Nothing matches the pure taste of buttermilk exactly, and if you really want to taste that flavor—if you’re making dip perhaps—you should try and stick with the real thing. But if you’re baking or making pancakes, don’t worry about using a substitute.

Source: The Best Buttermilk Substitutes

My five – they forgot milk + lemon juice.  Someone claimed it was vegan… but it is vegetarian, depending on your practice.

10 Food Staples You Can Make Better and Cheaper at Home

Many simple foods are not only easy to make at home, they’ll likely be cheaper, healthier, and much tastier than the store-bought varieties. From cheese to peanut butter, here are a few DIY, delicious food projects.

Source: Top 10 Food Staples You Can Make Better and Cheaper at Home

They forgot about tahini, but did mention nut butters.

Why Buttermilk Was a Life-Saving Innovation

Every day, we eat scientific innovations, and not just when we’re eating powdered cheese flavor. Our food is the result of remarkable discoveries by long-forgotten scientists. Here’s a look at the weird, and innovative, chemistry of buttermilk.

…buttermilk makes an important source of nutrition available to a whole new section of the population. Lactose isn’t easily digestible. Most animals, including certain humans, lose the ability to digest it as they age. Premature infants often don’t have the ability to digest lactose. When bacteria break lactose down to smaller components, they are pre-digesting it for people. People with mild lactose intolerance can take in buttermilk, and pre-formula medical guides recommend feeding premature babies buttermilk to keep them healthy.

Source: Kitchen Chemistry: Why Buttermilk Was a Life-Saving Innovation

This for That: Cooking & Baking Substitutes

Direct link to infographic.

Some stuff seems OK – it breaks out the component ingredients for things that are frequently bought as a combination, like poultry seasoning. The rest, though? They are not even close and would produce an entirely different thing in a lot of cases.  But then, that’s typically the challenge when trying to “veganize” and/or make a recipe gluten free for example.

…or you could just buy the actual ingredients 😉