Make a Creamy, Fiber-Packed Pasta Sauce Out of Beans

I have a passion for beans, which developed back when I used to cook for the Tuscan chef Cesare Casella. The Tuscans are famous for their beans (they’re sometimes called the mangiafagioli—bean eaters—in Italy), and Cesare is no exception. When I worked for him, he’d import thousands of pounds of beans every year from Italy, and I learned plenty of tricks from him on how to use them.

One of those tricks was this simple pasta with a sauce made from puréed beans, which I’ve made with chickpeas here. It couldn’t be easier to make: You simply sauté some garlic and red pepper flakes in olive oil, add some cooked beans along with some of their cooking water, then purée it to make a smooth, creamy sauce. Add a handful of whole cooked beans for some texture, and you’re basically done.

Source: How to Turn Beans Into a Creamy Vegan Pasta Sauce

Mashed beans pretty much all work the same. If you are having issues with lentils, you’re probably forgetting to ditch the lentil husks.

Thicken Soup with Blended White Beans for a Gluten-Free Alternative

While some broths are destined to remain thin and wispy, other soups taste best when served thick and creamy. But what do you do when it’s too late to add a slurry to a meaty soup? Or you’re gluten-free and must skip flour and bread? Or are vegan and don’t like the idea of butter in your soup?

The answer to all these culinary obstacles lies in white beans. Blended white beans.

Source: Here Is My Favourite Gluten-Free Way to Thicken Soup

Roasted carrots would help thicken too, while sweetening.

For a moment, I thought the recipe suggested navy beans – which contain a low dose of vitamin K (1 mcg of vitamin K per cup).  But cannellini beans have:

  • 1 tablespoon/12 grams of white beans contains 0.7 mcg of vitamin K – 1% Daily Value (DV)
  • 1 ounce/28 grams of white beans contains 1.6 mcg of vitamin K – 2% DV
  • 100 grams of white beans contains 5.6 mcg of vitamin K – 7% DV
  • 1 cup/202 grams of white beans contains 11.3 mcg of vitamin K – 14% DV

The example recipe calls for 0.25 cup, so roughly 50 grams.  That’s likely to be around 3 mcg of vitamin K, or 3% DV.  Be aware so you can be careful!