TV Binge Watching, Exercise Skipping Linked to Poor Cognitive Function

Passing on the gym to snuggle on the couch and binge watch whole seasons of your favorite show this weekend may not bode well for your brain.

Source: TV binging, exercise skipping linked to poor cognitive function

Correlation is far from demonstrating causation, especially in this case. People often “self medicate” – they tend to gravitate to leisure activities that they find rewarding. People that find mainstream TV shows painfully inane aren’t going to be spending their free time watching them.

But it is interesting about the standing desk, the war on sitting because of the mortality implications… but curling up on the couch for some TV gets a pass?

Study: Advanced Life Support Ambulances May Lead To More Deaths

Emergency treatments delivered in ambulances that offer “Advanced Life Support” for cardiac arrest may be linked to more death, comas and brain damage than those providing “Basic Life Support.”

That’s according to a study published Monday in JAMA Internal Medicine, which suggests that high-tech equipment and sophisticated treatment techniques may distract from what’s most important during cardiac arrest — transporting a critically ill patient to the hospital quickly.

Source:

It’s an important issue to us on blood thinners, when clots mean an increased risk in heart attack or aneurysm.  The study focuses on how Advanced Life Support (ALS) spends more time in the field – they’re trained (two years under a doctor as I understand) to work off the idea that immediate skilled care is in the “golden hour”, ASAP.  But I didn’t see anyone raising the point that ALS means you’re considering in bad/worse enough shape – there is a different, distinct call for ALS vs the usual ambulance.

It can be hard not to get caught in the moment and freak out about an ambulance, nevermind what type.  But it doesn’t do you any favours.

Arsenic in Rice: 11 Facts You Need to Know

We first heard the bad news in 2012. Rice contains arsenic, Consumer Reports proclaimed in a riveting 2012 study. But it left us with a host of questions: Which types of rice have the highest levels of arsenic? Which have the lowest? What about other rice products, such as rice milk and cereals? And what about other grains?

Source: Arsenic in Rice: 11 Facts You Need to Know

There’s two key points:

9. Don’t rely on an “organic” label—rice grown organically was found to have the same arsenic levels as “conventionally” grown rice. While organic rice may contain fewer pesticides, arsenic levels are still high.

10. You can cut your exposure by thoroughly rinsing rice before you cook it, and draining excess water after it’s cooked. Consumer Reports recommends a 6-to-1 water-to-rice ratio, rather than the standard 2-to-1 ratio. Yes, rinsing and draining rice might wash away some vitamins and minerals, but the rinse-and-drain technique will remove about 30 percent of the arsenic.

Arsenic in the Water: Heart Risk

Ana Navas-Acien can’t quite recall the moment when she began to worry about arsenic in drinking water and its potential role in heart disease.  Perhaps it was when she read a study suggesting a link among people in Bangladesh.  And a similar study in Taiwan. And in Chile.

Several years ago, Dr. Navas-Acien, an associate professor of epidemiology at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, decided to see if similar links could be found in the United States.

Source: A Heart Risk in Drinking Water

Sadly, the article doesn’t have any suggestions for preventative measures.  Only that they were looking at filters on wells.  Ground/well water is largely the focus.