It’s Okay to Cook Acidic Dishes in Cast Iron (and Other Cast Iron Myths, Debunked)

Despite the fact that humans have been cooking with cast iron for about 2000 years—cooks in the Han Dynasty (206 B.C. – 220 A.D.) used kettles and pans cast of iron—there still exists a ton of mystery around cookware made of the stuff. “Is my cast-iron skillet ruined if it’s rusty?” or “I heard you can’t use soap to clean a cast-iron skillet—is that true?” Don’t worry: We’re here to demystify cooking with cast-iron skillets, and to debunk any myths that surround caring for them.

Source: Six Stubborn Cast Iron Myths Debunked

Thirty minutes isn’t a long time to simmer tomato sauce though – depends on the tomato sauce. Some sauces — all’amatriciana, for instance — should not even be simmered that long. Well seasoned or not, you’ll still get some iron leaching into your food too, but that’s a good thing and the trade off makes it worth it. I choose not to cook acidic foods in my cast iron because I find I have to re-season it more often.

Use Your Cast Iron Pan as a Pizza Stone

Cast iron frying pans are versatile, durable, and remarkably cheap. While pans that have passed down for generations might have a whole lot of sentimental value, you can buy a brand new cast iron frying pan without shelling out much cash. But do you think of using one when you’re not frying up bacon?

Source: 7 Ways to Use a Cast Iron Frying Pan (Besides Frying)

Cast iron pans are also great for making deep dish pizza.  Which isn’t real pizza…. 😉