This 500-Year-Old Additive Makes Your Cheddar Turn Pink

If you’re the type with enough self-restraint to allow cheese to stay in the fridge for a while, you might be alarmed by the fact that it’s turned pink. Not to worry. It’s probably due to a harmless, and ancient, additive.

Source: This 500-Year-Old Additive Makes Your Cheddar Turn Pink

Maybe if they used much fresher annatto, some that’s newer than 500 years old, the cheese would not turn pink so fast. When I cook, I like to use the freshest ingredients I can find. 😉

The reason for the additive is not unlike what the industry is doing to farmed salmon, to dye the meat pink.

 

Cheese Swaps that will Update your Favourite Cheesy Dishes

Sometimes a little change can make a big difference, and that’s certainly the case when it comes to cheese. You can completely change a dish just by substituting the cheese you usually use for something new.

Source: Cheese swaps that will update your favourite cheesy dishes

I knew about the ricotta & goat cheese instead of cream cheese in cheesecake.  I’m not keen to try until I figure out how to stop the cracking.  Around here, there’s numerous interpretations of poutine.  Bacon is a popular addition.  I liked the last one I had, but it was quite salty.  I can say with experience that Grilled Brie with Pears was awesome.

Now I’m hungry 😦

Ask Science: Best Cheese for Pizza?

Advancements in pizza science is very serious business. Even the military has been experimenting with strange methods on how to extend the life of the average pizza.

Turns out the answer is…  You’ll have to read to find out, but:

…the reason [it] works so well is because of its low free oil content and its overall elasticity, allowing it a chance puff up and blister unlike the competition.

…understanding cheese on a micro-level could help develop low-fat and healthier alternatives to the cheeses we love by sacrificing little to no quality