The Science of Why Chicken Goes Bad So Quickly

Food-borne bacteria are the primary cause of spoilage and food poisonings. Thriving in moist, low-acid environments where lots of protein is present, pathogens like Salmonella, Campylobacter and E. coli live with the bird during its life and stay with its meat after slaughter; likewise, other bacteria, such a Acinetobacter and Pseudomonads fluroescens, putida or fragi, thrive on the meat after it’s processed. Given chicken’s somewhat unique qualities, quick spoilage is inevitable, and can only be mitigated by careful attention to time, temperature and moisture.

Source: The Science of Why Chicken Goes Bad So Quickly

It also depends on whether the chicken is organic, or Portland organic and whether it was able to take another chicken under it’s wing. Always look at the chicken’s dossier before making your final decision.  And count its fingers!

Some are reporting a trend to sell “Chicken without salmonella” and “eggs without salmonella”. From research, it shows that 99,99% of eggs is salmonella-free these days (without extra work, straight from the chicken) and Salmonella is killed at 75°C, so if you, by bad luck, have a salmonella infested piece of chicken or egg, just cooking it thoroughly already kills the virus.

Surprising Origins of the Animals [Some of] You Eat

Just what will you be putting on your plate during this holiday season? You probably already know that centuries of selective breeding have produced the creatures we love to feast on, but you might be surprised at how weird the process has been. Here are the 10 most startling origin stories for the animals that most people eat.

Source: The 10 Most Surprising Origins of the Animals You Eat

On a similar note, I treeplanted with a person who enjoyed dogs but would never own one for sake of the domestication the animal species has undergone over centuries.  Which brings up another point – that the list in the article is predominantly North American.

Potential Egg Shortage? Might Have to Shell Out

A new regulation is set to take effect in California at the beginning of next year that will force hen houses to allocate significantly more room to each egg-laying chicken.

Birds, long afforded a minimum of only 67 square inches a piece, will now need roughly 116 square inches—a more than 70 percent increase—if eggs are to be sold in the state. That extra space won’t come free of charge, a cost that will almost certainly fall on consumers.

Egg prices could jump by as much as 20 percent in California as a result of the the new rules, Dermot J. Hayes, an agribusiness professor at Iowa State University in Ames, told Bloomberg.

Source: California could be on the verge of a severe egg shortage, and it will affect the whole country

It will be interesting to see if history repeats itself, given the result of similar regulations in Europe.  Speaking from local perspective, farms don’t make money.  To put it another way – do you know any wealthy farmers?  They’re as rare as hen’s teeth 😉

UK: Fresh Chicken Contaminated

Chickens sold in Britain are still being contaminated with high levels of the potentially deadly food poisoning bug campylobacter due to poor practice within the poultry industry, public health officials have warned.  Supermarkets have also continued to allow chickens to be sold to consumers even though they have tested positive for high levels of the bacteria.

Officials at Public Health England claim that without sufficient legislation the industry will resist implementing measures that could help to reduce the contamination of chickens for fear it will drive up the cost of meat. Their warnings come as the Food Standards Agency is preparing to publish a survey assessing the campylobacter levels on chicken being sold at leading UK supermarkets. Preliminary results showed that the bacteria could be found on the meat 59% of fresh chicken products on sale.

Source: Campylobacter contamination found in over half of UK’s fresh chicken

Chicken: Bacon Wrapped, Stuffed

Yes, it’s as good as it sounds!  It’s not Cordon Bleu because the meat isn’t breaded.

I’m serving mine with mashed sweet potatoes and salad (various lettuce and a little carrot, cherry tomatoes, and corn).  The wine pairing rule is like to like, so white wine.  This is an evening meal, so the bacon would probably go with a red.  There are some basic things that you should do and know to drink beer/wine/scotch properly, but don’t be intimidated by people who list off reams of data and info, trying to prove how much they know. Alcohol is for one thing above all else; enjoyment.

Here’s the recipe – bon appetit!