Don’t Hate Perky Morning People: It Might Be Their DNA’s Fault

The people who burst from bed as the sun rises to cheerily tackle their to-do list—while others sluggishly rouse and fumble with coffee makers—may have a few DNA tweaks in common.

Source: Don’t hate perky morning people: It might be their DNA’s fault

Being a morning person is associated with lower risks of depression…  Speaking as a cheerful morning person myself, my theory is that part of that is all the free schadenfreude we get access to just by watching all the other poor schlubs trying to get moving in the morning.
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Sleeping In On Weekends Linked to Health Problems

Sleeping late on days-off—and other sleep-time adjustments—are linked to metabolic problems, including insulin resistance and a higher body mass index, according to a new study published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. The finding suggests that regular sleep shifts could rouse long-term health problems such as cardiovascular disease and diabetes, the authors conclude.

Though other research has connected sleep disruptions to poor health, the new study is the first to specifically link shifts in dozing times to metabolic problems. Those problems were independent of other factors such as sleep disorders, smoking, and socioeconomic status.

Source: Sleeping in on weekends linked to health problems

I don’t care if it shaves 5 years off my life. You can pry me early from my bed on Saturdays and Sundays when I’m dead (which again, may come early)! For anyone looking to avoid sleeping in on weekends, I suggest having small kids.  …or you could just go back to working all day, every day.

Drinking Coffee Late in the Day Will Screw Up Your Internal Clock

It’s no secret that drinking coffee shortly before bedtime disrupts sleep, but a new study suggests that caffeine can actually affect our body’s internal clock, pushing back our natural rhythms by nearly an hour.

Source: Drinking Coffee Late in the Day Will Screw Up Your Internal Clock

Related reads:

Do the benefits outweigh the lack of sleep?

How The First Bite Of Food Sets The Body’s Clock

Researchers are starting to learn why, when we cross time zones or pull an all-nighter, our bodies get out of sync.

Source: How The First Bite Of Food Sets The Body’s Clock

It’s a transcription of an interview.  It touches on how different organs have their own clock, though I’ve read that bacteria helping you digest food can also play with your rhythms.

Study: Tables & E-Readers Might Alter Your Sleep Schedule

In less than a decade, reading has shifted from the medium it dominated for centuries—paper—to screens of various sorts. The change in habit has been accompanied by concerns over whether this could be influencing sleep. Exposure to light biased toward blue wavelengths, such as that produced by the screens of tablets, has been shown to alter the circadian rhythms that set the body’s clock.

A number of studies have suggested that this is a real problem—enough that the Mayo Clinic’s advice on getting better sleep notes that “Some research suggests that screen time or other media use before bedtime interferes with sleep.” Now, new research published in PNAS provides some hard numbers to back up these worries. But it’s a small study with some significant limitations, so this shouldn’t be seen as the final word on the topic.

Source: E-readers and tablets really do seem to alter your sleep schedule

My narcolepsy kept me from participating in the study 😉

Study: 8 Ways to Lose Weight While You Sleep

…real, successful, sustainable weight loss comes from achieving excellence in a completely unexpected realm: the bedroom.

No, you can’t lovemake your way to lean. (Although if you want to try, check out our steamy story on 8 Libido-Boosting Superfoods.) But you can absolutely sleep your way to slender. In fact, no matter how many pounds you press, how many miles you log, how much kohlrabi you crunch, it won’t get you anywhere near your weight-loss goals unless you’re also getting enough quality sleep. A recent study found sub-par sleep could undermine weight loss by as much as 55 percent! The good news is just a few simple tweaks to your p.m. routine can mean serious weight loss success. So open your eyes: Here are eight science-backed suggestions to lose while you snooze.

Source: 8 Ways to Lose Weight While You Sleep

The first one – kitchen hours – has been previously covered.  Tolerating colder temperatures could save you heating costs while your body works to stay warmer.

What isn’t mentioned is how important sleep is when training.  One triathlete was saying that it was the sleep two days before your race that was important – because the night before you’re getting things together and in some cases – getting up in the early morning to fuel up.  But exercise in general needs rest to fully recover.

Study: Not Just What You Eat, But When You Eat It

Your genome is the same right now as it was yesterday, last week, last year, or the day you were born. But your microbiomes—the combined genes of all the trillions of microbes that share your body—have shifted since the sun came up this morning. And they will change again before the next sunrise.

Source: How Jetlag Disrupts The Ticks of Your Microbial Clock

Elinav says that the health implications of the study are still unclear—a necessary caveat, especially given the fashionable tendency to ascribe everything to the microbiome. Many studies have shown that people who work variable shifts, or who suffer from disturbed sleep or repeated jet lag, are more prone to various health problems, including obesity, diabetes, and even some types of cancer. This study suggests that microbes (or rather, diet via microbes) might be involved in some of these connections. But how big a role do they play, compared to other possible factors? No one knows.