Make This Tangy Citrus Dessert With a Simple Ratio

Citrus fruits, like all the orange varieties, grapefruits, lemons, and limes, truly are winter’s shining stars. With varying degrees of sweetness, tart, tang, and bitterness, these bright fruits have a knack for brightening winter’s coldest days.

Of course, you can eat them out of hand, or turn them into cocktails, vinaigrettes, and baked goods, but one of the very best ways to put that citrus to work right now is by making a sweet and tangy curd.

Source: Your Template for Sweet and Tangy Citrus Curd, 5 Ways

Curd will last five days in the fridge, but three months in the freezer.

Roasted Grapes Add Sweet, Decadent Flavor to Salads and Meat Dishes Alike

Around here, fall is better known as “roasted vegetable season.” From Parm-roasted cauliflower to sweet and spicy carrots, we just love what the combination of a hot oven and some olive oil does to root vegetables. But root veggies aren’t the only thing made better by a quick spin on a sheet pan. Here are our favorite unexpected ingredients to roast—as if you needed another excuse to crank the oven in the cooler weather.

Source: These Ingredients Are Unexpectedly Great When Roasted

I love cherry tomatoes – they’d never last long enough to warrant roasting.  But cabbage is high in vitamin KAs are leeks

I’ve heard for some that roasted Brussel sprouts and grapes are a thing…

Make Canned Cranberry Sauce Look Homemade With a Can of Whole Cranberries

Have you no shame?!

The centerpiece roast turkey, the spread of casseroles, the pumpkin pie (and, likely, the apple pie too) — there’s no shortage of to-dos come Thanksgiving. So when there’s an opportunity to make your prep work a tad easier, it’s indeed tempting to give in. Hear from The Kitchen‘s Sunny Anderson about how she transforms a tried-and-true store-bought staple — the infamous canned cranberries — into an all-new side dish.

Source: Sunny Anderson’s Canned Cranberry Thanksgiving Hack

If you cook whole cranberries for a couple of minutes in boiling mixture of sugar, water, and orange juice…  The berries burst all on their own, and you get a really nice cranberry sauce.

Steam Rice with Orange Rind for a Brighter Flavor

There are many ways to perk up a bland rice routine, from adding a few pinches of saffron to steeping rice in beer to enhance its nutty qualities.

One method to boost the flavor of plain rice without upping the calorie count is to throw a few orange skin peels into a boiling pot of rice or a rice cooker.

Source: Steam Rice with Orange Rind for a Brighter Flavor

Another good use for orange peels (or any citrus): Toss them in the garbage disposal to clean, de-stinkify it.

Stop Trying to Squeeze Out All the Lime Juice. Over-Squeezing Leads to Bitterness

When squeezing citrus juice, you probably try to get the most juice out so as to not waste money or the fruit. However, there’s a culinary reason you might want to squeeze only almost all the way: to avoid too much bitterness.

Source: Stop Trying to Squeeze Out All the Lime Juice. Over-Squeezing Leads to Bitterness

Over-squeezing leads to bitterness… Bitterness leads to hate… Hate leads to the Dark Side.

Come to the Dark Side… we have cookies.

Sorry, but These Popular Cold and Flu Remedies Don’t Actually Work

There’s something about “natural” medicine that makes us want to believe it works, even if there’s very little evidence to support it. I’ll admit that I’m guilty of trying every single one of the natural remedies in this gallery. And, with cold and flu season around the corner, I’ll likely give each of these a try again. Sometimes science is wrong, right?

Click through the gallery above to see if your natural cold and flu fighter actually works – or if it’s all in your head.

Source: Sorry, but these popular cold and flu remedies don’t actually work

I’ve covered vitamin C and the common cold in the past.

One approach I’ve used when faced with severe nasal congestion is spicy food.  Maybe not the best idea if you’re running a fever already, but can provide the ability to breathe through your nose (if not briefly).

Lead Exposure in Mothers can Affect Future Generations

A human girl develops their eggs while in the womb. A mother not only holds her daughter but the eggs of her grandchildren…

A team of researchers at Wayne State University have discovered that mothers with high levels of lead in their blood not only affect the fetal cells of their unborn children, but also their grandchildren. Their study, Multigenerational epigenetic inheritance in humans: DNA methylation changes associated with maternal exposure to lead can be transmitted to the grandchildren, was published online this week in Scientific Reports.

Source: Lead exposure in mothers can affect future generations

Lead-based paint and leaded gasoline weren’t banned until the late 1980s and still pose a significant health risk to many vulnerable populations (e.g. young children). Interestingly, leaded gasoline was actually phased out because it was causing the newly invented catalytic converters to get clogged. It wasn’t until after leaded gasoline was banned that people made the connection between high blood lead levels and leaded gasoline use.

Lead mostly poses a health risk to minorities and low-income residents though. Areas where homes are still coated with untreated lead-based paint that has now began to peel off and contaminate the soil. Children that are crawling on the floor/ground will get lead on their hands and later put their fingers in their mouths–this is the most common way.

Lead poses a unique risk to women (and children) due to the fact that lead is stored in the bones. During pregnancy, lead becomes agitated and will re-enter the bloodstream and be passed on to the child.

Today, researchers still have not found a toxicity threshold for lead, which essentially means that any amount of lead will have adverse health effects. Low-level lead poisoning negatively effects cognitive functioning and can cause individuals to exhibit lower IQs.

Bonus Time!

The Thrifty Phenotype (AKA Barker Hypothesis) – intergenerational disease risk in an elegant little bundle. First documented in Dutch children born in times of famine during WWII I think it was, but recognized all over now.  You could use known week of conception and a chart showing just when citrus became hard to come by in a given region to predict weight or head-to-waist circumference ratio at birth. And while that’s cool on its own, you could also use similar info to predict an individual’s risk for heart disease or or diabetes in adulthood.

Remove Odors from Your Entire Home by Simmering Vinegar

Some of our favorite tips in the kitchen are for getting it sparkling clean; these are their stories.

Source: 7 Kitchen Cleaning Tricks That Really Work

The fruit fly one is interesting.  …Not that I have a need for it… 😉

How/why does this work? What does the vinegar do?

Vinegar is about 90% water, and about 5-10% acetic acid.  Most scented molecules contain a functional group like an amine (putrescine, for example, one of the rotting smells), a thiol (ethanethiol, i.e. skunk smell), or other non-carbon molecules. Acetic acid can bind these to form molecules that your nose can not detect, thus eliminating the odor. Even if it’s not forming an actual chemical bond, it can still coordinate (i.e. form hydrogen bonds, which are pretty strong themselves. It’s analogous to dissolving.) thus removing the scented molecules from the air, woodwork, carpet, etc.

How to Make Your Own Bitters for a Signature Stamp on Every Cocktail

Any bar worth its rimming salt should be stocked with at least a couple of bottles of bitters. Sure, you can make a cocktail without them, but you can also roast a chicken without salt or pepper. Like these everyday seasonings, cocktail bitters add flavor and depth to almost any beverage, and making your own allows you to put a unique stamp on every cocktail you serve.

I urge you to think of bitters as a sort of “cocktail spice rack”, and to think of every cocktail as a choose-your-own-adventure type of situation. Homemade bitters are so easy to make (you just throw stuff in jars) that there’s no reason not to have a bottle to suit each and every one of your whims. Plus, they make great, super thoughtful gifts. (It’s September, everyone, which means it is just about time to start stressing about the holidays.)

Source: How to Make Your Own Bitters for a Signature Stamp on Every Cocktail

No matter how good you think they would be, never try to eat the fruit soaked for bitters. 😉

If you find yourself at a bar unable to afford decent bourbon (or the well sludge is on happy hour) ask for a splash of aromatic bitters with your drink. Turns a really crappy bourbon into a mediocre-to-poor bourbon, and they’ll never upcharge you for it.

Easily Upgrade Leftovers With a Simple Pan Sauce Recipe

Your pan should already have a tablespoon or so of fat in it (leftover from browning your meat); if it doesn’t, supplement with olive oil. Now add an aromatic or two to the pan: A couple of smashed garlic cloves or a sliced shallot; a sturdy fresh herb, like thyme or rosemary. Give them a few minutes over gentle heat so they release their flavors.

Source: How to Make a Simple Pan Sauce

This is essentially making a gravy for your leftovers, which is a straightforward enough idea, but I like that this recipe is so simple and quick, and you can make it straight from the pan after reheating left over food.