It’s Official: Bacon, Hot Dogs, Other Processed Meat Cause Cancer

After years of research and hundreds of studies finding links between eating certain meats and cancers, health experts have finally broken out the branding irons.

Today, in a sizzling announcement, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) officially marked processed meat, such as bacon, hot dogs, and sausages, as “carcinogenic to humans,” a “group 1” designation. The agency, an arm of the World Health Organization, also classified red meat, such as beef, pork, and lamb, as “probably carcinogenic to humans,” a “group 2A” grade.

Source: It’s official: Bacon, hot dogs, other processed meat cause cancer

This news is all over the place, but I was really surprised that there’s no actual scientific fact.  All I get is there was a meta-study that amounts to “there’s a correlation”.   It’s all speculative, nothing about how the meat is prepared or cooked.  It was almost a year ago that an actual link was found – in the neu5Gc content

Do Mini-Packaged Snacks Really Help You Eat Less Junk?

In recent years countless food manufacturers have been “sub-packaging” their foods into smaller portions in an apparent effort to curb folks from overindulging. You can usually find 100 kcal multi-packs of chips, pretzels, chocolates, and all sorts of junk foods. Despite the very obvious negative environmental impact of all this excess packaging, what, if any, impact does such packaging have on people’s consumption.

Source: Do Mini-Packaged Snacks Really Help You Eat Less Junk?

42 people is bigger (no pun, I swear) than some studies, but still not terribly huge…

My take is that most will treat themselves to more small packages under the impression that the caloric intake is not cumulative.

Coca-Cola is a Healthy Snack? How Company Promotes that Message

If a column in honor of heart health suggests a can of Coke as a snack, you might want to read the fine print.

The world’s biggest beverage maker, which struggles with declining soda consumption in the U.S., is working with fitness and nutrition experts who suggest its cola as a healthy treat. In February, for instance, several wrote online pieces for American Heart Month, with each including a mini-can of Coke or small soda as a snack idea.

Source: Coke is a healthy snack: How company pays to get out that message

I don’t think anyone out there is fooled by the advertisement.  If they read it at all…  I had encountered an article suggesting that soda/pop could be considered hydrating because it is designed to make you drink more of it.  And it is a diuretic, so there is some credence to flushing your system.  But there’s other things to consider:

Protein: Timing, Type and Quality for Optimal Recovery

When it comes to protein type, timing and quantity, we see conflicting information regarding intake everywhere.

Recovery? Protein!

Weight loss? Protein!

Reduce blood sugar swings? Protein!

Body composition change? Protein! Protein! Protein!

But there’s much more to it than just eat more (or less) protein. In this month’s post, I’d like to focus on the athletic population (a way to state a disclaimer that the general population is different and has different nutritional needs).

Source: Physiology and Nutrition: Timing, Type and Quality of Protein Consumption for Optimal Recovery

If you like technical articles rooted in kinesiology, this is for you.  It’s brief, but covers a fair amount of ground.  Good read for the serious athlete.