Make Any Tapenade With This Simple Formula

Enter tapenade. If you’re familiar only with the kind that comes in the small jar from the supermarket, you’re missing out. The time saved may seem to compensate for the less-than-ideal flavor, but you can make make a much better version at home in under 30 minutes. Here’s how:

Source: How to Make Tapenade Without a Recipe

There’s 1.4 mcg of vitamin K in 100 grams of olives, and the recipe calls for 2 cups (~360 grams).  That’s ~5 mcg of vitamin K…  Capers on the other hand contain 24.6 mcg of vitamin k per 100 grams.

Keeping in mind that the vitamin K dose is quoted on consuming all of the tapenade.  I’m not judging… 😉

On a more serious note, I would not recommend eating tapenade before an INR test.  If there’s a long enough interval between tests (1 month), then I’d suggest tapenade soon after getting tested so you have time for your INR level to recover in an effort to not have to adjust your medication dose.

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How Chemistry Transforms Crackers Into Apple Pie

Mock-apple pie filling is made, primarily, of crackers. There are no apples in it. Still, most people who taste it swear that they are eating real apple pie. What is the chemistry that tricks our senses?

If you want to make mock apple pie, here’s what you need.

Source: How Chemistry Transforms Crackers Into Apple Pie

World War II British cookbooks are a treasure trove of ‘mock’ foods. Rationing was utterly brutal from 1939 right through until the early 1950s, so imported things like sugar and fresh fruit were pretty much out of the question. So you get stuff like apricot tart with no apricots but using up grated carrots, almond essence and plum jam; mock banana from boiled mashed parsnip with a few drops of synthetic banana essence, or mock cream whipped up from margarine (regularly derived from whale oil), water, sugar and a touch of synthetic vanilla (from wood pulp).