Study: Former Biggest Loser Contestants’ Metabolisms Are Wrecked, Leading to Weight Gain

Contestants lost hundreds of pounds during Season 8, but gained them back. A study of their struggles helps explain why so many people fail to keep off the weight they lose.

Source: After ‘The Biggest Loser,’ Their Bodies Fought to Regain Weight

Two individuals, each of the same size/weight, but one who had lost a substantial amount of weight to arrive there, end up with significantly different resting metabolisms, such that it becomes impractical to maintain the weight loss.  The alternative for those people is to devote substantial amounts of time to exercise to maintain caloric burn rates that counter their abnormally low metabolisms.  That’s part of the lifestyle change – crash/fad diets do not work for the long term.

Why Your Brain Is Obsessed With Food at Night

It happens to all of us: You’re at home at night when suddenly a craving hits. Never mind that you’re not actually famished — you need food now. And, unfortunately, you’re probably going to eat more than you should.

According to new research from Brigham Young University, there’s science behind this phenomenon. In a new study published in the journal Brain Imaging and Behavior, researchers discovered that some areas of the brain don’t get the same “food high” at night as they do during the day.

Source: Why Your Brain Is Obsessed With Food at Night

This is not something I’ve experienced.  I have woken to pain/discomfort from being hungry.  Not often, and I started to eat more.  I didn’t like the experience, but also was concerned about too much weight loss.

Gut Bacteria: Assuming Control Of Your Brain

Counterpoint to the previous news about mentally controlling our diet:

It sounds like science fiction, but a new paper in the journal BioEssays says that bacteria within us — which outnumber our own cells about 100-fold — may very well be affecting both our cravings and moods to get us to eat what they want, and often are driving us toward obesity.

Source: Science 2.0

Train your brain to crave healthy food

It may be possible to rewire your brain so that it wants — craves, even — healthier foods.

Previous studies have shown that high-calorie, fatty, sugary foods trigger the pleasure center of the brain. That’s why you naturally crave these unhealthy foods: You expect to be rewarded with dopamine for eating them.

But people in the experimental group showed a slightly different response to seeing high-calorie foods after participating in the intervention program. Researchers saw less activity in the stratum when participants were shown these foods and more activity when they were shown lower-calorie foods.

Source: CNN

The sample size is incredibly small.