Pavlova: How Much Vitamin K?

This gets tricky, because Pavlova is a recipe… which can be customized to some degree.  But here goes…

Pavlova is made by beating egg whites (and sometimes salt) to a very stiff consistency before folding in caster (AKA very fine, berry…) sugar, white/distilled vinegar or another acid (e.g. cream of tartar or lemon juice), cornflour, and sometimes vanilla essence, and slow-baking the mixture, similar to meringue.  So said Wikipedia anyway

On that note, Pavlova doesn’t appear to have much if any vitamin K in it.  But it depends on what you serve on top of the Pavlova…  I’ve covered the vitamin K content of various dairy cream in the past.  You’ll have to investigate for yourself what the vitamin K content of the fruit that was served with or on it.

Five Simple Buttermilk Substitutions for Batters and Baked Goods

Maybe you don’t want to buy buttermilk for a recipe that calls for just half a cup of it, or maybe you’ve already started cooking and just realized you need buttermilk and don’t have any. Nothing matches the pure taste of buttermilk exactly, and if you really want to taste that flavor—if you’re making dip perhaps—you should try and stick with the real thing. But if you’re baking or making pancakes, don’t worry about using a substitute.

Source: The Best Buttermilk Substitutes

My five – they forgot milk + lemon juice.  Someone claimed it was vegan… but it is vegetarian, depending on your practice.

Cream of Tartar: How Much Vitamin K?

If you were concerned, don’t be.  Potassium bitartrate (AKA cream of tartar) has no vitamin K.  2 – 100 grams, no vitamin K.

How is it made?   According to Wikipedia (defaced it myself):

Potassium bitartrate crystallizes in wine casks during the fermentation of grapejuice, and can precipitate out of wine in bottles.

In food, potassium bitartrate is used for:

  • Stabilizing egg whites, increasing their heat tolerance and volume
  • Stabilizing whipped cream, maintaining its texture and volume
  • Anti-caking and thickening
  • Preventing sugar syrups from crystallizing
  • Reducing discoloration of boiled vegetables

Additionally it is used as a component of:

  • Baking powder, as an acid ingredient to activate baking soda
  • Sodium-free salt substitutes, in combination with potassium chloride

How Chemistry Transforms Crackers Into Apple Pie

Mock-apple pie filling is made, primarily, of crackers. There are no apples in it. Still, most people who taste it swear that they are eating real apple pie. What is the chemistry that tricks our senses?

If you want to make mock apple pie, here’s what you need.

Source: How Chemistry Transforms Crackers Into Apple Pie

World War II British cookbooks are a treasure trove of ‘mock’ foods. Rationing was utterly brutal from 1939 right through until the early 1950s, so imported things like sugar and fresh fruit were pretty much out of the question. So you get stuff like apricot tart with no apricots but using up grated carrots, almond essence and plum jam; mock banana from boiled mashed parsnip with a few drops of synthetic banana essence, or mock cream whipped up from margarine (regularly derived from whale oil), water, sugar and a touch of synthetic vanilla (from wood pulp).