Someone Did a Dumb Thing the Other Day…

That was a plastic cutting board…

Throw away the oven, lesson learnt. If they try a half ass cleaning job, enjoy cancer in the distant future.

All The Food Safety Questions You’ll Have On Thanksgiving Day, Answered

Family disagreements at Thanksgiving aren’t limited to politics at the dinner table: if you’ve ever stood in the kitchen arguing with your grandma about whether the turkey is done, you know what we mean. So we asked food safety expert Ben Chapman to settle your most likely disputes.

Source: All The Food Safety Questions You’ll Have On Thanksgiving Day, Answered

The US government is now posting warnings advising against cooking the stuffing inside the bird, since the correct cooking time for the turkey is not long enough to ensure that the stuffing is cooked enough to be safe.  Stuff the bird after cooking to get that extra flavour boost without the food safety worries because the turkey meat tends to hit the appropriate temperature before the stuffing does.

Smash Cucumbers Before Brining for Fast, Flavorful Pickles

Sichuan-style smashed cucumbers are the simplest example of one of these dishes, and coincidentally my favorite one. At some point in the last couple years, the technique of smashing cucumbers for salads has become so popular that the New York Times even wrote a trend piece about the subject. Does saying that they’ve been a thing long before the NYT discovered them make me a hipster? I suppose so. But it’s true. Smashed cucumbers have always been delicious.

Source: Smash Your Cucumbers for a Smashingly Simple Chinese Side Dish

Cucumbers have vitamin K, but it’s in the skin.  So if you want to minimize your exposure, it’s OK to skin the cucumber before consumption.

10 Stubborn Food Myths That Just Won’t Die, Debunked by Science

Every other week, new research claims one food is better than another, or that some ingredient yields incredible new health benefits. Couple that with a few old wives’ tales passed down from your parents, and each time you fire up your stove or sit down to eat a healthy meal, it can be difficult separating food fact from fiction. We talked to a group of nutritionists and asked them to share the food myths they find most irritating and explain why people cling to them. Here’s what they said.

Source: 10 Stubborn Food Myths That Just Won’t Die, Debunked by Science

Some of the myths have been covered on their own:

Must-Have Tools for Any Kitchen

It’s easy to get seriously excited about expanding your kitchen repertoire.  And in debt buying for that kitchen. Here are kitchen-related things you really need and how to use them efficiently.

Knives

You need two knives, minimum:

  • Chef’s knife
  • Pairing knife

The third option is a bread knife, if you see yourself cutting bread.  There are other types – here’s a run down.

Knives require maintenance, which means knowing the difference between sharpening and honing.  So a sharpener and a honing steel should be included.  And a cutting board – plastic or wood, the debate continues.

Pots and Pans

You want at least two pots, and a pan.  The choice is yours about whether the pan should be non-stick Teflon or cast iron.  It can be really nice to have both.  Cast iron will last a long time, if you maintain it.

Scale and Thermometer

Depending on what you’re doing, you can get away without these until actually needed.