Sour Cream, Crema, Crème Fraîche: What’s the Difference?

The headline makes me think of Seinfeld: “What’s the…”  But I digress…

Sour cream, crema, and crème fraîche: these three dairy products are often used to add a cool lusciousness and body to foods like potatoes, salads, and nachos. But while all three products are made the same way—by adding friendly bacteria to heavy cream—they’re all technically different ingredients.

Source: Sour Cream, Crema, Crème Fraîche: What’s the Difference?

While we’re here, might as well address vitamin K content…

Sour cream contains:

  • 1.8 mcg of vitamin K per 100 grams – that’s 2% of the Daily Value (DV)
  • 4.1 mcg of vitamin K per 1 cup/240 grams – 5%

I couldn’t even find information on crema – every search engine thinks I misspelt “cream”.  Sigh…

Crème Fraîche, according to sources, has 0 mcg of vitamin K.

If you consume in consistent quantity and frequency, you’re fine because your blood thinner medication dose already has it taken into account.  But depending on the amount you consume and timing just before an INR test, there’s a chance you could have a conversation with your doctor about changing your dose and testing again in the near future.

Milk May Do a Body More Harm Than Good

Contrary to popular belief, drinking large amounts of milk each day does not lower a person’s risk of bone fractures and instead may be associated with a higher rate of death, according to a new study. This is counter-intuitive to what has long been championed by some doctors and nutritionists: A diet rich in milk products can build strong bones and reduce the likelihood of fractures for those at risk for age-related bone loss.

Source:

The article stresses at the end that this is correlation, not causation.  But they did say that eating yogurt or inferior curdled milk-based products such as cottage cheese did give the “positive benefits associated with milk,” without any of the excruciating bone fractures and premature death.

You do not need to eat dairy foods to get the calcium you need in your meal plan. Calcium is provided by a wide variety of foods, and in order to get 1,000 milligrams per day (the Dietary Reference Intake, or DRI for women and men 19-50 years of age), you could eat sardines, scallops or sesame seeds.  There’s plant sources but being spinach and such, the vitamin K content is a concern.  Lots of processed foods are calcium fortified because the food sources aren’t part of the typical diet, but the value is debatable.  For more information on calcium see this page.

For more information on vitamin D and how it functions, see this post.

Study: Junk Food Worse for Male …Mice

Stuffing down a burger and coke may be more harmful for men than women, if the results of a new mouse study apply to humans.

The detrimental impact of junk food seems to be connected to inflammation in the brains of male mice, with the brains of females protected by oestrogen, according to research published today in Cell Reports.

Source: Junk food diet worse for male brains

The article only covers that this has been seen in mice, and they hope this leads to confirm the issue exists for humans. And ladies: menopause means that protection is gone.

Even on cheat days, there’s better stuff to eat than junk food like: