Genes Change Your Risk for Disease, but Aren’t Necessarily Destiny

In 1951 essayist Norman Cousins wrote: “The hand that is dealt you represents determinism. The way you play your hand represents free will.” He was writing about the nature of man, but it’s not unreasonable to extrapolate his thoughts to the part that our genes play in our health.

The genetic material we inherit from our parents may be a blueprint, an instruction book used to build our body and to keep it running, but – for most of us – it doesn’t determine our fate completely.

Source: Genetics: Risk or Destiny?

Disease is one aspect; athleticism is another.  I’ll never be an elite athlete, but that won’t stop me from enjoying a hobby.

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Scientists Find Cure For Type 2 Diabetes in Rodents, Don’t Know How it Works

The cure for type 2 diabetes may be all in your head, a new study in rats and mice suggests.

With a single shot to the brain, researchers can rid rodents of all symptoms of the disease for months. The injection, a relatively low dose of a tissue growth factor protein called fibroblast growth factor 1 (FGF1), appears to reset powerful neural networks that can control the amount of sugar in the blood.

Source: Scientists find cure for type 2 diabetes in rodents, don’t know how it works

Oh sure. When some guy in a lab coat injects something into a rodent’s brain it’s call “science”. When try to inject something into a bear’s arm I get banned from the zoo and arrested for having heroin.

Genetically Speaking, You’re More Like Your Dad

You may have inherited your mother’s eyes, but, genetically speaking, you use more DNA passed down from your father. That’s the conclusion of a new study on mice that researchers say likely applies to all mammals.

We humans get one copy of each gene from mom and one from dad (ignoring those pesky sex chromosomes) that hasn’t changed. The same is true for all mammals. But that doesn’t necessarily mean that mom and dad genes are equally active in creating who we are.

Researchers now report that thousands of mouse genes show parent-specific effects, and that on balance, the scales are tipped in favor of dads. Studying whether this imbalance exists in humans could give scientists insights into the causes of inherited conditions like diabetes and heart disease.

Source: Genetically Speaking, You’re More Like Your Dad

Nearly Half a Billion People Now Have Diabetes

Tomorrow is World Health Day, and to mark the occasion, the World Health Organization has released its first ever global report on diabetes. The results are frightening.

Source: Nearly Half a Billion People Now Have Diabetes

I have a friend who is a podiatrist; you’d be amazed the stories I’ve heard of folks with gangrene or other lesions that they’ve had for months and allow to go untreated.

People eating crap (*consistently*) and not even caring a little about their health…I don’t get it.

I’d type more but my lunch pizza is getting cold.

Genetically-Modified Maggots Could Help Wounds Heal Faster

Scientists at North Carolina State University are bringing an 18th century wound treatment into the 21st century. They’ve genetically modified maggots to secrete a human growth factor to promote healing while they clean people’s wounds.

Source: Genetically-Modified Maggots Could Help Wounds Heal Faster

The news about benefit for leg and feet ulcers is something those of us with blood clotting issues experience too.  It’s gross, I don’t recommend searching for images of it.  But those pictures led me to wear compression socks.  Not medical grade currently – commercial grade socks can be difficult on their own.

Parents’ Bad Diets May Mess With Genes, Boost Kids’ Risk of Obesity, Diabetes

A crummy diet can obviously have a lasting impact on the waistline—but for parents, it may also have a lasting impact on DNA and the family line, a new study suggests.

Source: Parents’ bad diets may mess with genes, boost kids’ risk of obesity, diabetes

It’d be interesting to test if the epigenetic changes are permanent, or if they can be reversed by the fat mouse loosing weight.

The CDC’s Vaccine Quiz Tells You Which Vaccines to Get as an Adult

Autism or death from pneumococcal meningitis. It’s a simple choice, really 😉

By your early 20s, there’s a good chance you are due for some boosters, said Dr. Wanda Filer, president of the American Academy of Family Physicians. You may also “need to play catch-up” if you’ve missed any vaccines or failed to complete a series, she said.

Everyone needs a tetanus and diphtheria booster every 10 years; the shots are often combined. So if you were 12 the last time you had a tetanus shot, you’re due for one at 22.

Adults ages 19 to 64 should also get a pertussis, or whooping cough, booster. Pregnant women should be vaccinated against pertussis toward the end of each pregnancy in order to protect their newborns from this disease, which can be devastating for a baby.

Source: Ask Well: Booster Shots for Grown-Ups

Here’s the direct link to the CDC online vaccination quiz.  And just because some people get bad reactions, doesn’t mean we all should avoid them.

Doctors are always impressed by my exact knowledge of my last tetanus shot – March, 2015.  I broke ribs, will never forget that.  The pain that came from sneezing, coughing or even laughing…

Stem Cell Breakthrough Could Put an End to Daily Insulin Injections for Diabetics

People with type 1 diabetes have to inject insulin daily, and it often results in pain, redness, swelling, and itching at the injection site. But this could soon be a thing of the past, thanks to a new breakthrough that takes us one step closer to a functional cure for type 1 diabetes.

Source: Stem Cell Breakthrough Could Put an End to Daily Insulin Injections for Diabetics

Sounds promising. However, type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease, wherein one’s immune system attacks and kills the insulin producing cells in one’s pancreas. I wonder what will keep the immune system from going haywire a second time. I am guessing they are on that too.

Study Suggests Drinking Coffee Might Reduce Liver Damage From Alcohol

There is a growing body of evidence that coffee may be good for your long-term health, reducing the risk of type II diabetes, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s. According to one recent meta-study, it may also lower your risk of liver damage from boozing.

Source: Study Suggests Drinking Coffee Might Reduce Liver Damage From Alcohol

I’m always curious if these studies include cream, sugar… decaf. Do the benefits persist in spite of them, are the cons of the two in those quantities negligible, or do these controlled studies usually go for plain black coffee?

Nuff said.

“Dangerous Paleo Diet” Study is Ragged With Holes

There’s a deep sense of irony in adding to a never-ending series of headlines on a study that shouldn’t have had any attention paid to it at all. But the publication on the dangers of the “paleo” diet that’s spawned countless headlines is so flawed that it’s worth exploring why it got so much attention.

Source: “Dangerous paleo diet” study is ragged with holes

I hate how the popular press covers nutrition and health. Popular journalism on this is a garbage fire. Its terrible.

You get dubious results like this ampped up to full volume. You get an emphasis on in individual isolated studies instead of a focus on broad scientific evidence. You get idiots like Dr. Oz and Michael Pollan taken as credible experts on things, and even given TV shows to spew their garbage. You get blatant pseudoscience that contradicts the scientific consensus taken as a credible/sensible opinion.