The Stinkbird’s Diet is Surprisingly Close to Our Own

Stinkbirds, otherwise known as hoatzins, have spread out across South America in part because they have something in common with humans and other mammals. The clue is in the name “stinkbird.”

Source: The Stinkbird’s Diet is Surprisingly Close to Our Own

On the other hand, Hoatzins don’t produce great mounds of birdshit. The reason that urban Canada geese are such profuse shitters is that they are grazers, but lack the Hoatzin’s gut adaptations for getting the most out of a diet consisting mainly of leaves. So they have to eat a lot of fodder in order to get anything out of it with their inadequate digestive systems, and of course this results in a massive output.

On the plus side, geese can still fly really well.

What “Net Carbs” On Food Labels Actually Means

 A myriad of low-carb products are marketed as having “zero net carbs”, but a closer look at the nutrition label reveals most of the “cancelled” carbs to be from dietary fiber or sugar alcohols. What does this wizardry mean for calorie and carbohydrate counters? Not as much as the marketing would have you believe.

Source: What “Net Carbs” On Food Labels Actually Means

Net carbs is vastly more important to read that total carbs. The tortillas I buy are about 22g carbs, 6 net carbs. Eating two or three makes all the difference between having an elevated blood sugar, or up 100 points for a few hours.

The Benefits of Fiber (And How to Know You’re Getting Enough)

Years ago I remember lamenting (and writing somewhere) that I was fairly sick of reading research papers on how eating more fiber was good for people, how it was time for nutritional science to move into relatively more interesting things than a topic that had literally been beaten to death.

Thankfully, soon thereafter leptin was discovered and nutritional researchers could start looking at things more interesting than why eating high-fiber vegetables were good for you (a nutritional tidbit that I file under the ‘Grandma was right’ category).

Even so, there is still some confusion regarding fiber out in the world of nutrition regarding fiber.  And boring or not, it’s a topic worth clearing up.  So today I want to take a fairly comprehensive look at dietary fiber, what it is, what it does in the body, how it impacts on things like body composition (and health to a lesser degree) and finish by looking at some (admittedly vague recommendations).

Source: Fiber – It’s Natures Broom

Fibre can be your friend if you want to avoid hemorrhoids. Bananas, rice, dried plums (prunes) 4 lyfe!

Too much of a good thing is… not so good. Don’t try increase your fiber intake too fast (too furious?), unless you’re planning to spend a lot of time in the bathroom. You’ve been warned.