Make Colorful, Tangy Sprinkles Out of Dried Fruit

On a new-year-new-you kick and all about that clean-eating life? God knows I’m not, but I’m all about experimenting in the kitchen and looking into ways to cut out any unnecessary added sugar and preservatives. Enter these technicolor “sprinkles,” made from at-home dehydrated citrus zest and unsweetened, freeze-dried fruit.

Source: Recipe: Sugar-Free Citrus & Fruit Sprinkles

Because there’s no sugar, the flavour will be sour/bitter.

This would be perfect for those that like to buy plain yogurt because they want to avoid added sugars and other ingredients. You could make your own fruit powders using a dehydrator, or your oven on its lowest setting, and then just toss the dust into a salt shaker with some rice to help keep the moisture out and increase its shelf life (but you would probably want to store it in the fridge when not in use).

What Makes a Dip a Dip: A Guide

Figured I’d post this early in case someone needs it

According to sources, this weekend is the Super Bowl, a time-honored tradition where men bang each other’s heads together, causing years of damage that eventually leads to death (and probable financial ruin before that), as the American public watches in glee while consuming mass quantities of unhealthy foods and alcohol. But let’s not focus on those unnecessary details. Let’s talk about one of those unhealthy foods: dip.

Source: What Makes a Dip a Dip: A Guide

Related – Is double dipping a health risk?

Make Your Dips, Dressings, and Drinks a Little More Probiotic with Kefir

Tangy kefir is like a pourable, drinkable version of yogurt. It’s praised for containing good-for-you probiotics that aid in healthy digestion. While kefir makes for a delicious beverage all on its own, there are a lot of other smart ways you can put this fermented drink to work in the kitchen.

This fermented dairy drink is similar to yogurt and buttermilk, and makes an ideal stand-in for both. You can pick up a bottle of kefir in the dairy aisle at the grocery store, or you can skip the lines and make your own at home.

Source: 5 Smart Ways You Could Be Using Kefir in Your Cooking

It can be used in pretty much any recipe that calls for un-fermented dairy. Use it in place of buttermilk, spoon for spoon, in savory dressings and dips, or as a tart milk substitute in smoothies, lassis, or even frozen yogurt. (Wanna get next level? Make your own!)

That said, I can’t find any substantial nutritional data on kefir.  One source claims it has vitamin K, yet [the similar] yogurt has very little vitamin K.  I advise caution and frequent testing if kefir is not already part of your consistent diet.

How to Make Healthy Choices at a Summer BBQ

Salad is just lettuce nachos 😉

Not sure what your healthiest options are when faced with an impressive spread at a summer barbeque?  We asked nutrition and wellness expert Rose Reisman to chime in on our best (and worst) options at backyard shindigs this summer.

Source: This or that? How to make healthy choices at a summer barbecue

I’m surprised to see a crisp suggested as a dessert.  I thought they were largely sugar, with some fruit.