Here’s a Major Change That Hospital Ranking Systems Need to Make

If you’re lucky enough to be able to choose your hospital and have time to research your choices, you’d naturally take mortality rate into account. There’s a problem with that, and one change in how mortality rates are calculated could help solve it.

Source: Here’s a Major Change That Hospital Ranking Systems Need to Make

I think the authors may have missed a larger point. The variation in DNR patients may track facilities who serve more acutely ill populations. Without a more sophisticated look at the populations served, acuity of patients presenting for care, and level of patients kept versus being transferred out due to acute illness – incorporating DNR orders in the score weighting may not make them more accurate.

The interesting point for further research is whether or not DNR orders are a useful indicator or perhaps substitute measure for the other complex variables I noted above. Not having access to the study, I can’t tell whether the authors considered the point.

Your Doctor Probably Has A DNR. Here’s Why You Should Consider One, Too.

Most patients receiving end-of-life care want to avoid aggressive attempts to prolong their life, but medical culture and practices often contradict these wishes. Part of the problem is due to confusion surrounding do-not-resuscitate orders. Here’s what patients really need to know about the “no code.”

Source: Your Doctor Probably Has A DNR. Here’s Why You Should Consider One, Too.

First-responders would likely ignore any DNR-themed jewelry, markings, or tattoos, and only a specific form from the health sector specifically targeted at first-responders would stop them from providing standard care. Are first responders going to rifle through your pockets looking for such a form while they’re trying to save your life? Probably and hopefully not. The hospital setting, however, is where living wills, DNR-orders, powers-of-attorney, next-of-kin, etc. can be more readily honoured and better detailed. You could probably check the policies in your own jurisdiction for clarification.