You Can Train Your Body Into Thinking It’s Had Medicine

The results were part of a well-known and seemingly mundane phenomenon that has been driving a quiet revolution in immunology. Its proponents hope that by cutting drug doses, it will not only minimise harmful side-effects but also slash billions from healthcare costs, transforming treatment for conditions such as autoimmune disorders and cancer. The secret? Teaching your body how to respond to a particular medicine, so that in future it can trigger the same change on its own.

Source: You can train your body into thinking it’s had medicine

This is at least a second cup kind of article, so I’ll be back because I’m curious if the effect is transferable.

Clinically, placebos been at least 50% as effective as real drugs.  But this is more than just a mere placebo effect. It’s a true form of conditioning the body’s response.  It creates a trigger based on sensations and memory whether the patient knows what they are taking is the real medicine or not. Placebos mimic medicine from the beginning and works more effectively if the patient is fooled into thinking it works. No deception is required here.

How Much [X] Could You Eat Before It Would Kill You?

Toxicologists have a saying that “the dose makes the poison,” meaning that anything and everything can kill you in large enough quantities. So here we take five incredibly common (and usually benign) foods and household items to their illogical conclusion. Ever contemplated eating 480 bananas? Don’t do it.

While we’re on that note, this isn’t a dare. Also, drinking that much coffee sounds disgusting.

Source: How Much [X] Could You Eat Before It Would Kill You?

Who would eat toothpaste?!  But “food coma” does not get a mention…

The dose is much lower when administered orally. We're still trying to get the paper into the needles for subcutaneous injection.

LD50