Pedialyte May Help Your Hangover, But It Won’t “Cure” It

It was the early morning hours of July 5, and after a day of drinking and greasy food, Patricia Ochoa was sufficiently hungover. She had all of the classic symptoms: dry mouth, headache, exhaustion, and an upset stomach. Then, her brother appeared at her bedroom door like the hangover tooth fairy with a bottle of grape Pedialyte. She tore off the “kid-approved taste” sticker on the cap and started gulping it down.

Yes, Ochoa was using an over-the-counter remedy intended for dehydrated children (think: bad bouts of diarrhea) as a hangover cure. And the crazy thing is it worked. After drinking half the bottle, her headache and nausea disappeared.

Source: Is Pedialyte Truly the Miracle Hangover Cure People Say It Is?

Kids these days just don’t take enough responsibility for dragging themselves to the store and buying their own medications when they’re sick! When I was their age, I crawled to the grocery store! Uphill! In the snow!

Adults “make up a third of the market” or “are a third of the buyers” or constitute “a third of the sales”. So, perhaps the youth of today really are spending their allowance on their own diarrhea treatment? 😉

Four Myths About Hydration That Refuse To Die

As Derek Zoolander wisely put it, wetness is the essence of life. Whether you like drinking water or not, it accounts for about 60% of your body weight, and plays a pretty darn important role in making sure your body functions normally. But statistics aside, there are a couple of myths about hydration that refuse to die.

Source: Four Myths About Hydration That Refuse To Die

You can read about my experience looking into myth #1.  I have never attempted to drink that much water since.

The blurb about myth #3 does not mention skim milk or chocolate milk as a recovery drink.   Providing you’re not lactose intolerant or have ideological issues with drinking cows milk, it’s hydrating, provides carbs and protein, and a good source of calcium and vitamin D (necessary for processing calcium).

There is also an argument that diuretics (coffee, pop/soda) can be beneficial because they will encourage you to drink more when most aren’t motivated to drink more water.  They can be more enjoyable than water – certainly understandable in places where filtration can’t do enough for water.  Hard water tastes horrible…