Rainbow Heart Cookies for Your Valentine?

Ultimate Valentine Day’s Cookies! Here come rainbow heart cookies called “Eugenie Cookies.”

Source: Valentine Rainbow Heart Eugenie Cookies

This is so much work. You have to really like someone to spend 5 hours making them a batch of cookies that look neat & taste okay:

Pavlova: How Much Vitamin K?

This gets tricky, because Pavlova is a recipe… which can be customized to some degree.  But here goes…

Pavlova is made by beating egg whites (and sometimes salt) to a very stiff consistency before folding in caster (AKA very fine, berry…) sugar, white/distilled vinegar or another acid (e.g. cream of tartar or lemon juice), cornflour, and sometimes vanilla essence, and slow-baking the mixture, similar to meringue.  So said Wikipedia anyway

On that note, Pavlova doesn’t appear to have much if any vitamin K in it.  But it depends on what you serve on top of the Pavlova…  I’ve covered the vitamin K content of various dairy cream in the past.  You’ll have to investigate for yourself what the vitamin K content of the fruit that was served with or on it.

Make Granola from Anything You Have On Hand With This Ratio

Memorize this technique, and you’ll never buy granola again.

Source: Granola Is Better and Easier to Make Without a Recipe

Having trouble finding cost effective rolled oats?  Look for Quaker Rolled Oats in the cereal aisle.

Bonus: If you are making granola and you want big chunks, pack all your ingredients tightly together on a baking sheet (I find it easier on a lipped baking sheet but plain should work fine). Once the granola is baked and cooled, you can break it into chunks.

Bring a Pot of Water to a Boil Faster by Microwaving Half of It

We love a great big labor-intensive all-day cooking project as much as the next crew of food writers, but that doesn’t mean we’re above cutting corners—especially when those corners save time and effort without compromising deliciousness. And yes, sometimes we even buy pre-made tomato sauce. From last-minute meals to do-this-all-the-time hacks, here are our go-to cooking cheats. May they serve you well.

Source: Staff Picks: Our Favorite Kitchen Shortcuts

I have to make some hummingbird food, and it takes a while for 6 cups of water to come to a boil…

Someone should run a test comparing the time and energy consumed for various techniques.

  1. Do as above, microwaving half until 200 degree F, and placing half on the stove top for heating, then combining and cook.
  2. Microwave all the water to say 200 degrees F and then place the water and pasta on the stove top to complete the cooking.
  3. Heat the water in two pans on the stove top and then combine and cook to completion.

Which leads to another question; what is the comparison on electricity use? Am I spending more money to microwave half my water than if I had heated it all on the stove?  Consider that electricity use will be different depending on the cooktop.  Microwaving the entire thing is the most energy efficient solution, short of an electric kettle. If you have an induction stove, it will be close. (note that this doesn’t account for the fossil fuel -> electricity conversion or the variance in fuel costs).