Use Chickpea Liquid to Make the Fluffiest Egg-Free Pancakes Ever

Recipes and techniques generally advance in baby steps. It’s rare that you find a technique so far out of left field that it changes the way people think about food overnight. Sous vide cooking is up there, as is no-knead bread. In the world of vegan cuisine, nothing has shaken things up like aquafaba—the recently coined term for the liquid inside a can of cooked beans. It’s the kind of technique that’s so mind-blowingly simple that I’m amazed nobody discovered it until just a couple of years ago.

Source: Use Aquafaba to Make Extra-Light, Fluffy Egg-Free or Vegan Pancakes

I discovered aquafaba with a recipe for two ingredient meringues a few months ago. It has since nearly completely replaced my use of prepackaged egg substitutes. I am eating a lot more chickpeas now as a result. I’ve also found that canned chickpeas freeze well and defrost quickly.

Make Crispier, Fluffier Waffles With Perfectly Whipped Egg Whites

Fluffy, buttery interiors and crispy, crunchy exteriors are the hallmarks of a good waffle — a vehicle worthy of the finest maple syrup indeed. However, making waffles that actually end up that way is another story. Not with this recipe!

Here, we’re harnessing the power of whipped egg whites to give waffles that coveted airy crunchy and adding one must-have ingredient that really sets pancakes and waffles apart.

Source: How to Make the Lightest, Crispiest Waffles

You can use buttermilk to this end as well.

Cream of Tartar: How Much Vitamin K?

If you were concerned, don’t be.  Potassium bitartrate (AKA cream of tartar) has no vitamin K.  2 – 100 grams, no vitamin K.

How is it made?   According to Wikipedia (defaced it myself):

Potassium bitartrate crystallizes in wine casks during the fermentation of grapejuice, and can precipitate out of wine in bottles.

In food, potassium bitartrate is used for:

  • Stabilizing egg whites, increasing their heat tolerance and volume
  • Stabilizing whipped cream, maintaining its texture and volume
  • Anti-caking and thickening
  • Preventing sugar syrups from crystallizing
  • Reducing discoloration of boiled vegetables

Additionally it is used as a component of:

  • Baking powder, as an acid ingredient to activate baking soda
  • Sodium-free salt substitutes, in combination with potassium chloride