Carrot “Lox” Is a Tasty Vegetarian Bagel Topper

Chickpea “tuna,” I still love you, but when it comes to non-fish fish, nothing holds a candle to carrot “lox.”

There’s no salmon here, but the carrots—fileted, seasoned with smoked salt and liquid smoke, then steam-roasted in the oven—are remarkably similar in color, texture, and flavor, too.

Source: What Looks Like Lox & Tastes Like Lox But is Made of Carrots?

In the briefest of summaries, what’s been omitted is the key ingredients to make it taste like lox: Liquid Smoke + ‘smoked’ sea salt — just in case people decided not to click thru to read the full recipe.

Liquid Smoke is controversial for some folks and you can read about it at Serious Eats.

Make Fluffier Scrambled Eggs With a Little Seltzer Water

I’ll skip the thick, flat, dense eggs, thank you very much. Instead my favorite scrambled eggs involve a plate piled high with large, soft yellow curds that spring back with the lightest touch and practically melt in my mouth; the kind of eggs that are fluffy and almost cloud-like.

A quick splash of milk or cream certainly makes for tender eggs, and might even give them some fluff, but there’s another ingredient that does the job even better.

Source: Get Even Fluffier Scrambled Eggs with This Unexpected Ingredient

I don’t know man. Mountain Dew Eggs sounds like a complete breakfast.

I’ve never used seltzer, but a little water in scrambled eggs rather than milk… I do think it makes for a better, fluffier texture. I will try out the seltzer too, makes sense.

Eggnog Makes The Tastiest Three-Ingredient French Toast Ever

Each year we splurge on this amazing locally made eggnog since it’s the only time of year they make it. One of our family traditions is to trim the Christmas tree while drinking eggnog and munching on cookies.

And one of the best parts about having this eggnog around? It makes the best French toast ever.

Source: Why Leftover Eggnog Makes the Best French Toast

Try it in a baked recipe for a bread pudding-like breakfast.

This Video Explains What Can (and Can’t) Affect Your Metabolism

The only strictly genetic component to an “increased” metabolism is the amount of “Uncoupling Protein” you have on the inner cell membrane of your mitochondria. The more of this protein you have, the less efficient your body is at turning calories into energy so to speak. The calories are just turned into heat energy. This requires more calories to support body function.

A high concentration of these mitochondria with a high levels of UCP are located within what’s called brown fat. This brown fat is strictly used to generate and maintain body heat. The amount of brown fat that you have decreases with age, contributing to 90 y/o men wearing cardigans in the summer and a slower “metabolism.”

Also, the “eat smaller meals more frequently” is actually a fallacy. Much like “always eat breakfast,” it becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy. Healthy people hear it’s healthy, attach themselves to the habit, and it becomes consequentially associated with health.

9 Best New Proteins for Weight Loss

It burns fat. It builds muscle. And it tastes awesome.

It’s easy to love protein. All of our favorite foods — burgers, steaks, pork chops, bacon — are  packed with it. And with the ever-growing popularity of whey-protein shakes, we’re taking in more of this essential muscle maker than ever before.

But are we eating the right kind?

Source: 9 Best New Proteins for Weight Loss

The article mentions a “complete protein”, which I understood to have been debunked.  Much as I love hummus, it is high in calories.  I did hemp seeds for a while, but trendy stuff costs.  You can get as much by combining sesame, sunflower and pumpkin seeds…

Why Wine Can Trigger Your Food Allergies (and How to Avoid Them)

Here’s a fun fact you may not know: not all wine is vegan. Some wine is clarified with “fining agents” that are made from animal products.

These fining agents help eliminate proteins, yeasts and other molecules that give wine a cloudy appearance. They can also eliminate harsh tannins, helping the wine taste smoother at a younger age, wine blog VinePair says. As The Kitchn explains, the fining agents attract molecules. By collecting around the fining agent, the molecules form larger particles that are then easier to filter out of the wine.

Source: Not All Wine Is Vegan, And Here’s Why

The amount of the fining agent left in the wine (or beer) might be minute, but some people are extremely sensitive to any amount.

Another wine production thing I was not aware of.  I would expect this to be an issue for the large scale wine production outfits.  It never came up when I was working for someone who was transitioning from accounting to wine making.  My recollection was wine makers were interested in good grapes, and what you got in the bottle was it for that year.  It depends, but a lot do not grow all the grapes themselves.  They’ll have some of their own, but source a fair bit from local wine grape growers.

The article mentions the wine bottle label.  I don’t know what or if anything changed since I last looked into it, but there was no standardization whatsoever as I knew.  I get the impression that hasn’t changed.

Truth in advertising

The Myth of High-Protein Diets

MANY people have been making the case that Americans have grown fat because they eat too much starch and sugar, and not enough meat, fat and eggs. Recently, the Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee lifted recommendations that consumption of dietary cholesterol should be restricted, citing research that dietary cholesterol does not have a major effect on blood cholesterol levels. The predictable headlines followed: “Back to Eggs and Bacon?”

Source: The Myth of High-Protein Diets

These are not controlled studies.  While controlled studies provide better evidence, they are not feasible for all questions (in this case it would be impractical and unethical).  Results from observational studies like this one are not invalid, you just need to consider potential confounding, as they seem to have done here.  The study itself says that substituting fish, poultry, and nuts for red meat lowered the mortality risk.

This is no surprise coming from Dr. Dean Ornish, a longtime advocate of eating a plant-based diet. But his phrasing here surprises me. He seems to be suggesting that high protein in and of itself is bad, even if you’re getting your protein from low-calorie, low-fat sources like salmon.

Processed meats are so tightly linked to diabetes that we can inject rats with a compound from meat and cause diabetes. However, this is just processed meats we’re talking about. If you just cut some raw meat and then cook it, you’re mostly fine.

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