Whole-Grain Flour Has a Short Shelf Life, So Freeze It

Let’s just say you were unable to resist the temptation of the bulk bin aisle, and you’ve arrived home with a half-dozen baggies filled with everything from quinoa flour to einkorn. These things happen, but not to worry, because you have plans — big plans! — for baking all sorts of wondrous things in the coming weeks.

Okay, you eager-beaver baker, you — do you know where you should be storing all your lovely bags of whole-grain flour until your schedule clears? Do you know why?

Source: Why You Should Probably Be Storing Your Whole-Grain Flours in the Freezer

Why should I care about it being in an air-tight container? Because even in the freezer, the fats will react (slowly) with oxygen and become rancid. In an air-tight container, the oxygen level will eventually drop too low for the reaction to continue, thus preserving the flour for a longer time than flour stored in the freezer and constantly exposed to fresh oxygen.

On the flip side, whole grain wheat has a shelf live of over 30 years if properly prepared, sealed and stored.  Just add a grinder for flour.

Researchers Finally Solve The Mystery Of Exactly How Popcorn Pops

Popcorn: it’s equally fun to make and to eat. But just what makes each kernel pop the way it does and what is the ideal temperature for popcorn to pop at? A new study answers all these questions.

“Popcorn is the funniest corn to cook, because it jumps and makes a ‘pop’ sound in our pans,” begin the researchers in their new article in the Journal of the Royal Society Interface. Indeed! But the knowledge about to dropped has only just begun, as the researchers explain that though the basics of popcorn popping are understood, the precise mechanics of the process remain shrouded in mystery:

Source: Researchers Finally Solve The Mystery Of Exactly How Popcorn Pops

Want to test?  I have a recipe for Carnival Kettle style.  Or keep it vegan/vegetarian with some brewer’s yeast.  Just a kernel of knowledge…