Teach Yourself to Love a New Food by Adding a Dash of Fat, Sugar, or Salt

A lot of times, people ask me how to acquire a taste because they want to learn how to like kale—or, even more commonly, they want to find out how to get their kids to like healthy foods. The truth is that we’re not genetically predisposed to dislike certain foods. In fact, we’re predisposed to like the majority of them (with the exceptions being bitter and ammoniated things because they can be hallmarks of spoilage or something that’s not necessarily safe). The problem comes with the messages our culture gives us about certain foods.

Source: Andrew Zimmern Explains How to Acquire a Taste

“Acquired taste” is the Stockholm syndrome of food 😉

I think it’s important to understand why you’d seek to acquire a taste.  I think it’s good to try, but also to be able to accept that if you don’t enjoy it?  Try something else.  It’s possible you’ll find what you like along the way.

How to Eat Healthy in a World Filled With Processed Food

Picture a wholesome meal: lots of veggies, maybe some pastured meat or free-range eggs, lovingly cooked at home from scratch. Do a quick count of how many of your meals from the past week looked like that. Close to zero? You’re not alone.

Our world is full of processed food, for better or worse. It’s easy to sit at my keyboard and tell you to avoid it and eat foods in forms closest to how they are in nature: apples, not apple pie. But just because something is “processed” (whatever that means) doesn’t automatically make it bad for you. It’s time to lose the guilt and own up to eating processed food sometimes—and maybe we’ll see it’s not that bad.

Source: How to Eat Healthy in a World Filled With Processed Food

Eating healthy can be more expensive than just eating whatever is out there. Sure you can sign up for CSA shares, and grown your own stuff, but in an apples to (organic)apples (ha!) comparison, expending the same amount of personal effort, it pays to shop around.  Part of it can be just adjusting foods to lifestyle – some stuff can expire before you use it.  That’s what made incorporating fruit/vegetables difficult for me, then I wanted to eat something else which made the problem worse.

Lower Levels of Fat Hormones May Contribute to Runner’s High

Fat cells secrete the hormone leptin as a means of signaling the brain when we’re full after eating. But new research indicates that leptin may also play a role in motivating us to exercise as well—possibly contributing to the phenomenon of “runner’s high.”

Source: Lower Levels of Fat Hormones May Contribute to Runner’s High

I don’t know about other runners, but I start feeling the effects of a runners high between 15 and 20 minutes of the start of a run and the effects last well through the day. If other folks experience their runners highs around the same point that I do, they can still get three highs a week doing 45 minute jogging sessions.

These Fast Food Options Can Fit Even a Healthy Eating Plan

It’s great that fast food chains have detailed nutritional information for all to reference, but the issue is that these charts are often deliberately buried on websites and can be cumbersome to read. One blogger has compiled a master list of the “best” fast food options from major chains, with their macronutrient values, for our convenience.

Source: These Fast Food Options Can Fit Even a Healthy Eating Plan

It happens – you get stuck somewhere, can’t get what you need.  It’s OK to have a cheat meal, or “fail” on your diet occasionally – there can be benefits.

Even More Evidence BMI Isn’t a Good Measure of Health

We already knew BMI isn’t a great measure of whether a person is fat or not, but now a study confirms that it’s not a good measure of health either.

Source: Even More Evidence BMI Isn’t a Good Measure of Health

It’s weird that BMI has stuck around so prominently. It’s a crude, blunt instrument that people think is precise. The only inputs in the equation are height and weight so it’s essentially meaningless.

Fat Cells Change What They “Eat” As They Mature

For something we try so hard to lose, fat cells make a very pretty picture when stained with red dye. And a new study has found that the nutrients they consume as they mature changes in a significant way.

Source: Fat Cells Change What They “Eat” As They Mature

When you dive into all the amazing things fat cells do to keep you alive they are incredible. My body’s ability to convert asparagus and Twinkies into those tiny little capsules of survival is just awe inspiring…. Thank you body but please stop now.

Artificially Sweetened: How Politics Massaged the Science in the New Dietary Guidelines

The [US] federal government just released a new set of dietary guidelines, and as always, they’re a work of both science and politics. They include controversial changes: for instance, sugar now has a limit, and cholesterol does not. Here’s your guide to what’s new, what isn’t, and where the experts disagree.

Source: Artificially Sweetened: How Politics Massaged the Science in the New Dietary Guidelines

I know of not one person who actually gives any credance to what the fools at the USDA say. Certainly not enough to measurably change their diets.  But school lunches, WIC, and military meals are based on this. Dieticians base their advice off the guidelines. And media of all kinds is full of news about how people should be paying more attention to the new cholesterol and sugar guidelines.

Do we all go and look up exactly how many cups of vegetables we should be eating? No. But they do have a major effect on what the country eats.  After all, if everybody ignored the guidelines, industry wouldn’t be so eager to influence them.

The 20 Best Full-Fat Foods for Weight Loss

…now I can get fat 😀

It’s time to get fat.

Not around your waist, but on your plate: A new report from the Credit Suisse Research Institute found that more and more of us are choosing whole-fat foods over skim, lite, fat-free or other modern monikers of leanness. And while many health organizations like the American Heart Association still want us to cut down on fat—particularly saturated fat—this full-fat trend may be a healthy rebellion against those decades-old credos, according to recent studies.

Source: The 20 Best Full-Fat Foods for Weight Loss

The article fails to mention why fat is good in our diet: fat soluble vitamin uptake is greatly improved when consumed with fat.  So I don’t know why they listed protein as something that is improved by eating fat…

Be mindful of how much vitamin K there is in the suggested foods:

When It Makes Sense to Add Extra Fat to Your Meal

Now that fat is overcoming its bad reputation, it’s becoming trendy to add it to food and drinks for health reasons—whether that’s putting butter in your coffee for dubious benefits, or swapping “Lite” salad dressing for a drizzle of bacon grease. But when does adding fat make sense, and when is it a bad idea?

Source: When It Makes Sense to Add Extra Fat to Your Meal

I was glad to see the article talk about how we’ve come to know that fat intake increases our uptake of fat soluble vitamins.  There is most certainly nutritional value in having fat in our diet.

You Can Measure Your Body Fat, but No Method Is Truly Accurate

If you say you want to lose weight, you’ll probably measure progress by stepping on a scale. But in truth, what you’re trying to lose is fat, and the number on the scale may not reflect that. There are many ways to measure your body fat percentage, but they all come with different levels of (in)accuracy.

Source: You Can Measure Your Body Fat, but No Method Is Truly Accurate

Stay away from impedance measurement – the reliability is simply too low to be valuable at any level (but specifically for the more inexpensive models found in gyms). There’s a reason we still teach skinfold measurement in university classes: while it’s not perfect, it’s accurate enough for non-elite athletes and the average person.