Why Wine Can Trigger Your Food Allergies (and How to Avoid Them)

Here’s a fun fact you may not know: not all wine is vegan. Some wine is clarified with “fining agents” that are made from animal products.

These fining agents help eliminate proteins, yeasts and other molecules that give wine a cloudy appearance. They can also eliminate harsh tannins, helping the wine taste smoother at a younger age, wine blog VinePair says. As The Kitchn explains, the fining agents attract molecules. By collecting around the fining agent, the molecules form larger particles that are then easier to filter out of the wine.

Source: Not All Wine Is Vegan, And Here’s Why

The amount of the fining agent left in the wine (or beer) might be minute, but some people are extremely sensitive to any amount.

Another wine production thing I was not aware of.  I would expect this to be an issue for the large scale wine production outfits.  It never came up when I was working for someone who was transitioning from accounting to wine making.  My recollection was wine makers were interested in good grapes, and what you got in the bottle was it for that year.  It depends, but a lot do not grow all the grapes themselves.  They’ll have some of their own, but source a fair bit from local wine grape growers.

The article mentions the wine bottle label.  I don’t know what or if anything changed since I last looked into it, but there was no standardization whatsoever as I knew.  I get the impression that hasn’t changed.

Truth in advertising

10 Bad Habits That Bloat You

Sometimes it comes from excess air trapped in your digestive tract. Other times it feels like a basketball is stuck in your abdomen, or your entire midsection has been flooded with water.

Whatever bloating feels like to you, one thing’s for sure: it’s uncomfortable.

And though bloat rarely signals something serious and typically goes away after several hours (eased up by moving around, drinking water, and just waiting it out), a distended middle can make you feel lethargic, clumsy, and suspecting you’ll never be able to button your jeans again. Welcome back your flatter belly by saying goodbye the habits that are prone to puff you up.

Source: 10 Bad Habits That Bloat You

Well, I know it’s not the kale…

Sticky Situation: Fraud in Honey

Large scale tests on US supermarket honey now reveal that roughly 75 percent of honey on the market isn’t even real. According to investigation by Food Safety News, today’s mass produced honey is often times void of real pollen, artificially processed and laundered from China. Honey manufacturing experts and the World Health Organization agree that real honey must contain true microscopic particles of pollen, to be considered real, with an identifiable source. Honey void of pollen is an artificial, nutrition-void, watered-down scam.

Source: Seventy-five percent of honey bought at the supermarket isn’t real honey

While the article distinguishes that pollen needs to be present to be called “honey”, it doesn’t say if there’s any value one way or the other.  Lack of pollen would people with pollen allergies wouldn’t have to worry…

While not mentioned in the article – stuff branded as manuka honey is highly suspect, given the interest in it’s perceived health benefits.  Which isn’t any different than the documented fraud in olive oil

Real honey is cloudy, not clear.  Most wouldn’t recognize it if you showed it to them.

The Teal Pumpkin Project: Food Allergy Awareness for Halloween

This Halloween, FARE is encouraging communities to start a new tradition that will help make this holiday season less scary for children with food allergies: the Teal Pumpkin Project. This campaign encourages people to raise awareness of food allergies by providing non-food treats for trick-or-treaters and painting a pumpkin teal – the color of food allergy awareness – to place in front of their house along with a free printable sign from FARE to indicate they have non-food treats available.

Source: The Teal Pumpkin Project

I’m surprised someone didn’t do this sooner.