Press Your Knees Into Your Elbows to Fix Your Deadlift

Lifting a huge weight off the ground requires a ton of different muscles to work in sync. When you get your form right, you’ll be able to lift more weight and protect yourself (somewhat) from injury. This tip helps to wake up all the right muscles for a strong deadlift.

Source: Press Your Knees Into Your Elbows to Fix Your Deadlift

If you’re starting with the bar, be sure to rest it on some plates or boxes to get it off the ground so you can better master the form (when the bar is in the 45lb plate, it will be a good 8” off the ground). As you start to add weight, check to see if your gym has the bumper plates – they’ll be 10, 15, 20, 25, and/or 35lb plates that are the same size as the 45lb plates, so the bar will be at the proper height.

How Your Body Shape Affects Weight Lifting Form: A Physics Lesson

You’ve heard all the cues, from keeping your chest up, to pushing your knees out. You’re sure you’re doing everything right, but it still feels all wrong. If this sounds anything like you at the gym, it might be because you’re not using the right form for your body.

Source: How Your Body Shape Affects Weight Lifting Form: A Physics Lesson

I also recommend filming yourself. Some apps track bar travel, as well as measuring acceleration and velocity. It’s helped me find sticking points to adjust form.

Use The “Arrow Formation” to Improve Your Push-Ups

The push-up is underrated in the strength and conditioning world. Why? Because too many people do it wrong. They often set up with their hand position high and wide. If you took a snapshot from above, their set-up would look like the letter T. People do this to make the exercise easier. Why is this position easier?

Source: Tip: Do This to Make Push-Ups More Effective

I think there are a bunch of different ways you can do push-ups, none of them being “right” (although some are definitely wrong). Which ones you do is more a matter of what muscle groups you want to work than any one specific form being the “right” one.

Record Yourself Exercising to Improve Your Technique and Form

In weightlifting, form and technique are everything. You can think you’re doing everything right, but you wouldn’t know for sure unless you’ve been trained by a professional, actually watched yourself lift, or ideally, both. Sure, you can ogle yourself in the mirror, but a better way to learn is to record a video of yourself with your phone’s camera. Then you can review it later (ideally with a trainer) and see what you should fix.

Source: Record Yourself Exercising to Improve Your Technique and Form

The other day I was talking with a high level coach about exactly this.  She originally didn’t like “distance training/coaching”, but then that was before the days of the internet.  As the article mentions, pretty much everyone has a cell phone these days that includes the ability to take pictures and video.  Add to that VOIP tech like FaceTime and Skype, where we can video chat.

Also mentioned in the article is the bit about being self conscious.  It reminded me of the time I started training martial arts in front of a mirror.  Once I got over not liking seeing myself, it became a great tool.

How to Minimize Your Risk of Injury When Lifting Heavier Weights

The one time my mom watched a video of me deadlifting, she cringed with fear that I was going to hurt myself. In reality, though, you’re just as likely (if not more so) to get injured doing other physical activities. That doesn’t mean you should throw weights around willy-nilly. You still need to prioritize safety to avoid getting seriously hurt. Here’s how.

Source: How to Minimize Your Risk of Injury When Lifting Heavier Weights

Lots of this can be applied to body weight exercises (yoga, Pilates).  Form is extremely important in yoga – I really don’t like seeing someone’s shoulders pointing towards me, but their hips aren’t :/

This is why I recommend doing such exercises with someone who will watch and is knowledgeable – so you can get proper, constructive feedback.