Make Your Own Doritos With This Seasoning Blend

In The Doritos Effect, author Mark Schatzker discusses the complex flavor profile that makes snack foods like Doritos and Coca-Cola irresistible. Everybody knows what Coca-Cola should taste like, but it’s very difficult to isolate exactly what’s going on. Do we taste a little bit of vanilla? A hint of lime? Maybe some cinnamon? It’s the same with Doritos, which are at once cheesy, garlicky, peppery, and packed with umami. Your brain can’t completely process their taste—which means it’s easy to consume large quantities without ever getting sick of that elusive nacho-cheesier flavor.

Source: How to Make Tortillas Taste Just Like Doritos

This recipe needs some Accent (or other brand of MSG) to be a little more authentic to the original. Before anyone complains, MSG is no worse for you than salt and it really boosts the umami flavor of the cheeses.

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Chicken Salt Is the Australian Seasoning You Should Put on Everything

Aussies travel in packs in the United States, so if you meet one, you meet twenty. And when Aussies get together, the conversation inevitably turns to chicken salt, how it’s not available in the States, and how it should be. Everyone wants to export it or recreate it but it turns out that complaining about not having it is easier than doing either. When we were opening Dudley’s Deli we finally decided to make it.

Source: Chicken Salt

Most of us don’t have a hotel pan, and probably won’t buy one for this. A cookie sheet lined with a cooling rack would work well.

Freeze Cranberry Sauce and Gravy for The Best Thanksgiving Croissants Possible

Making Thanksgiving croissants is a three-day process. I started making the compound butter two days ago. I paddled together butter and Thanksgiving spices: dried sage, dried thyme, granulated onion, onion powder, salt, sugar, pepper, and a little turmeric for color. We developed the recipe from looking at the ingredient list for Stovetop stuffing.

Source: How to Make Thanksgiving Croissants

Lots assume that there will be a lot of leftover gravy. In my experience, gravy always runs out long before the turkey does, and I often have to cobble together substitutes for that first yummy batch with the meat dripping and carving juices.  So if you run out:

Roast and then simmer the giblets with veggies to get some flavorful broth to add to the pan drippings. Start with a (I know, it’s horrible) store-bought stock, dissolve flour or cornstarch in water, add it to the boiling stock, then add the giblet stock and pan drippings. If you use decent quality store stock, you won’t notice the difference and you can make half a gallon of gravy.  Or buy a couple of turkey thighs or legs and roast them a few days ahead and store the deglazed pan drippings in the freezer until the big day.

Use Leftover Corn Husks to Bake or Grill Perfectly Juicy Fish

Even in my adulthood, I continued the shuck-and-discard routine, only keeping the husks on if I grill. But recently I realized how wasteful I’ve been, and — as if I trashed a pair of jeans after one wear — I’ve been tossing out a valuable culinary ingredient every time I undressed my corn.

If you’ve ever eaten a traditional tamale, then you’ve experienced the cooking power of corn husks. But what about other dishes? You can add washed corn husks to your stock pot for extra-woody flavor, which could be nice in a mushroom soup or corn chowder. Or like a tamale, use those husks as a wrapper for sticky rice in place of lotus leaves. But let’s take it one step further and use them for both their flavor and wrapping abilities by placing some seasoned fish inside, like en papillote, and throw the whole thing on the grill.

…One ear of corn will yield about six to eight usable husks, give or take, so plan accordingly for how you will use the husks and how much fish you will be cooking.

Source: Why You Shouldn’t Throw Away Corn Husks

Or use banana leaves…