Why We Like the Smell of Our Own Farts

Dutch oven for science! 😀

Interesting point about clothing minimizing health issues spread via farting.  I wonder if it’s an issue for nudists?

Don’t Worry About the “Gender” of Your Nutrition Bars

You can’t escape nutrition bars.

The foodstuff—that doesn’t quite look like food—lines grocery store shelves, fills office kitchen drawers, and hides squished at the bottom of backpacks and purses, preemptive strikes against future hunger emergencies. Not all bars are created equal, of course. “Protein bars” place emphasis on muscle building. “Energy bars” hone in on the concept of food as fuel, the snack to tide you over between meals. And “nutrition bars” target “health and weight-conscious consumers”—veiled language for the belief that nutrition bars are supposed to be for women.

Source: The Stereotype-Driven Business of Selling Nutrition Bars to Women

So basically the same thing as every other “For X gender” product ever?  Gotcha.  Men’s chapstick is brilliant – it comes in a flat tube to fit in the pocket better.  Because they don’t carry purses…

It’s not about the gender of the marketing – try it for yourself to determine if it works for you.  There’s no absolute rule for nutrition in triathlon because everybody is different.  Even within gender.

Scientists Can Now Establish Your Gender From a Fingerprint

Fingerprints may be unique, but without an existing record they can’t help identify a person. Now, though, researchers can use chemical analysis of the prints to identify the gender of whoever left them behind.

Source: Scientists Can Now Establish Your Gender From a Fingerprint

Gender and sex are synonymous to the great majority of people on earth, but gender is a social construct. Sex is the term used when differentiating male creatures from female ones biologically.  Even then, there are cases of women born without ovaries and people born with both sex organs…

6 Healthy Ways to Get More Protein

The required daily amount of protein varies by age, gender, and level of physical activity. In general, adult women who fit in at least 30 minutes of moderate exercise (such as jogging or biking) five times weekly should consume 5 to 5.5 ounces of protein per day. Women who work out more should increase their protein intake accordingly. Each of the following options offers a meatless alternative for one ounce of protein.

Source: 6 Healthy Ways to Get More Protein

If you’re interested in protein consumption information, this article is a good read.

Almonds can be costly; sunflower seeds are marginally cheaper.  The primary ingredient of hummus is chickpeas/garbanzo beans (how much vitamin k?)…  Don’t get me wrong – I like hummus.  Hummus, like avocado, is very nutritious but high in calories.  Peanut butter isn’t an option if you’re allergic, but no mention about other nut butters

This Video Explains What Can (and Can’t) Affect Your Metabolism

The only strictly genetic component to an “increased” metabolism is the amount of “Uncoupling Protein” you have on the inner cell membrane of your mitochondria. The more of this protein you have, the less efficient your body is at turning calories into energy so to speak. The calories are just turned into heat energy. This requires more calories to support body function.

A high concentration of these mitochondria with a high levels of UCP are located within what’s called brown fat. This brown fat is strictly used to generate and maintain body heat. The amount of brown fat that you have decreases with age, contributing to 90 y/o men wearing cardigans in the summer and a slower “metabolism.”

Also, the “eat smaller meals more frequently” is actually a fallacy. Much like “always eat breakfast,” it becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy. Healthy people hear it’s healthy, attach themselves to the habit, and it becomes consequentially associated with health.

Good News Unmarried Couples – Cohabitation is Good for You

In healthcare professions, it’s common knowledge that married people have better overall health and lower mortality than their unmarried peers. However, a new study published in AJPH indicates that adults who are cohabitating have midlife health outcomes that are similar to adults in formal marriages. So in terms of the benefits specific to marriage, we can probably strike “longer, healthier life” from the list.

Source: Good news for unmarried couples—cohabitation is good for you

This comes on the heels of the news about how sick families with children get.  So it’s healthy to live with others, to a point 😉

New Study, Also Everyone You Know: Dudes Lie When They Feel Weak

Dudes like to feel like dudes, and some would argue, they need to feel like dudes—or else. So the surest route to provoking a certain sort of dude to dude out is to question his dudeness in any way. It’s a truth as old as time and as obvious as its passing, but now, a very validating study has backed up the truth of dude overcompensation in a fairly hilarious way.

Source: New Study, Also Everyone You Know: Dudes Lie When They Feel Weak

The cultural implications are interesting…  However, I wonder how much of this is an instance of statistical significance vs. colloquial significance.

Consider this: an average increase of 3/4’s of an inch could be a large proportion of men simply rounding up (I’ll be honest, I don’t remember my exact height off hand, so I’m sure I’ve done that), or a small proportion of men greatly exaggerating their height.

One would tell us something about men, as a group. The other would tell us something about a particular kind of masculinity. They’re both looking into, obviously.