How Much Flavor You Get from Ginger Depends on How You Cut It

There are the ingredients that wax and wane in the kitchen. The ingredients that somehow find themselves in every meal or are left to collect cobwebs in the corner of cabinets and grow soft in the back of the fridge. But not ginger — never ginger. This rhizome, often described as a root, is often used in my kitchen as a way to bring heat to a dish without reaching for a pepper — I just have to be sure to reach for the right one.

Source: Need to Kick Up Your Dish? Reach for (Mature) Ginger

Curious about how much vitamin K ginger has?  Know that you can use the peels to make tea

Freeze it. When you need it, grind it. The first thing you’ll notice is that the stringy part is no longer stringy and grinds right off. The second thing you’ll notice is that you’ll have fresh tasting ginger even when you keep it in the freezer for months. After more than half a year, there’s still no freezer burn or shriveled up ginger.

Ginger: How Much Vitamin K?

Not to be confused with redheads… 😉

I remember ginger as something I was told to avoid while on blood thinners.  But research consistently says consuming ginger is not a concern while on warfarin/coumadin.  There’s 0.1 mcg of vitamin K in 100 grams/3.5 ounces of raw ginger – there’s so little, it’s basically non-existent.  I love ginger, as an ingredient in a recipe or various forms of candy: covered in sugar, or chocolate…

There’s numerous health benefits, to the point that hospitals stock ginger ale for sore throats and to soothe stomach aches.  I’d never heard of ginger being used for motion and sea sickness, but apparently ginger is good for reducing dizziness, nausea, vomiting, and cold sweating.  Here’s some other things ginger is known for:

  • anti-inflammatory
  • protection against colorectal cancer
  • Ovarian cancer cell death
  • boosting the immune system

Tips for ginger:

  • Freeze it to make it last longer, and easier to peel or grate.  But hard to cut…
  • Putting powdered ginger into a recipe that calls for fresh ginger is not recommended and vice versa.
  • A nugget of ginger can be used for flavouring (IE: in a soup), but removed before serving
  • You could peel & grate the ginger before freezing, but this bypasses two major benefits:
    1. Ginger grates really easily and finely when frozen, and even obviates the need to peel
    2. You don’t create a lot of surface area for oxidization when you do it this way, which means it actually tastes fresh