Avoid Slimy Okra by Boiling Before You Chop

Okra’s inherent stickiness is great for gumbo, but less-than-appetizing just about everywhere else.

Source: No Slime Time

Fried is awesome, but the best way I’ve found to cook it is on the grill (or stir fry). Wash them, then add a little olive oil, some salt & pepper in a bowl, coat the okra with it & stick it on the grill. Leave it on just long enough to singe the hair (which is about the time the okra gets soft—between 5 – 10 minutes), then take it off & eat it. For even more added goodness, throw some cherry tomatoes in the same mix, then grill them too. But be careful, while the tomatoes also taste amazing, they are full of molten lava for a while.

In case you’re wondering, okra is high in vitamin K.  Salted or unsalted:

  • 1 ounce/28 grams of okra contains 11.2 mcg of vitamin K – 14% Daily Value (DV)
  • 0.5 cup/80 grams of okra contains 32 mcg of vitamin K – 40% DV

Use Leftover Corn Husks to Bake or Grill Perfectly Juicy Fish

Even in my adulthood, I continued the shuck-and-discard routine, only keeping the husks on if I grill. But recently I realized how wasteful I’ve been, and — as if I trashed a pair of jeans after one wear — I’ve been tossing out a valuable culinary ingredient every time I undressed my corn.

If you’ve ever eaten a traditional tamale, then you’ve experienced the cooking power of corn husks. But what about other dishes? You can add washed corn husks to your stock pot for extra-woody flavor, which could be nice in a mushroom soup or corn chowder. Or like a tamale, use those husks as a wrapper for sticky rice in place of lotus leaves. But let’s take it one step further and use them for both their flavor and wrapping abilities by placing some seasoned fish inside, like en papillote, and throw the whole thing on the grill.

…One ear of corn will yield about six to eight usable husks, give or take, so plan accordingly for how you will use the husks and how much fish you will be cooking.

Source: Why You Shouldn’t Throw Away Corn Husks

Or use banana leaves…

Steak: 10 Rubs and Marinades

Youtube, 6:07 minutes.  The video is pretty, but doesn’t give portioning or summarize – details are on the web page.

Once again, we’ve asked our friend Chef Frank Deloach to help us think of 10 exceptional ways to season steak to add flavor without adding fat. Directions? Combine ingredients, rub all over your gorgeously marbled beef slabs (think Ribeye, Strip and Sirloin) and pop it in the fridge (two hours max) to soak up all those beautiful flavors. Cook in cast-iron skillet to desired doneness. Easy peasy. Tip: For the juiciest steak possible, salt your beef after you’ve cooked it.

Source: 10 Fancy Steak Rubs and Marinades That Go Beyond Salt and Pepper

  • Tex Mex
  • Kalbi
  • Spanish
  • Kung Pao
  • Brazil
  • Montreal
  • North Africa
  • English Pub
  • Carne Asada
  • Malaysian

Cast iron and an oven to finish is the goal.  Most real chefs use a salamander, but will use a skillet/oven combo if they don’t have that particular piece of equipment.  There’s nothing inherently wrong with a grill.

Make Hashbrowns with a Waffle Iron or Grill

Shredded or mashed potato, seasoned as you like.  If I’m using sweet potatoes, I have to use cinnamon…

Depending on your waffle/grill, coat with a non-stick spray if necessary.  High heat, press and cook to desired texture – crispy/crunchy might take 15-20 minutes, depending on how much you put in.

If you made too much, freeze the leftovers.