Warnings Against Powdered Caffeine and Energy Drinks

In a blog about the meeting, Michael Landa, director of FDA’s Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition, wrote that the agency shares the hopes of Katie and Dennis Stiner and Julie and James Sweatt that other families will be spared such a loss.

Landa noted the consumer advisory about the dangers of pure, powdered caffeine that FDA published in the summer, adding that “We are working right now on our next steps.”

But for now, “I cannot say strongly enough how important it is to avoid using powdered pure caffeine,” Landa wrote. “The people most drawn to it are our children, teenagers, and young adults, especially students who want to work longer to study, athletes who want to improve their performance, and others who want to lose weight.”

Source: Caffeine Powder Concerns FDA, Energy Drinks Concern Denmark

Do you know how much caffeine your kids and loved ones actually injest?

Our kids may be consuming more caffeine than we realize. A new study finds that 73% of children and young adults in the United States have caffeine in their systems on any given day.

I’ve remember years back that some found the results of injesting caffeine to resemble the fear response.  Suggested reading: Coffee: How it affects the Brain, and Naps

Caffeine Overdose Awareness

The sudden death of 18-year-old Logan Stiner grabbed headlines last May when the high school senior died from a surprising and rare cause: a caffeine overdose.

Stiner’s family found a small bag of caffeine powder — sold legally in the U.S. and easily purchased over the Internet — in their home after the Ohio teen’s death. The official autopsy revealed that Stiner had experienced a seizure, along with cardiac arrhythmia, from ingesting a toxic amount of caffeine. Stiner, a wrestler and star student only one week from graduation, had a blood caffeine level over 20 times higher than that of a typical coffee drinker.

…While deadly caffeine overdoses are rare, less-severe overdoses are relatively common. There were more than 20,000 U.S. emergency room visits due to energy drink consumption in 2011, according to government data. Symptoms of mild caffeine toxicity include nausea, vomiting, heart palpitations, a racing heartbeat, agitation and hyperactivity, Wang says. And if you’re not used to caffeine, even a couple cups of coffee is enough to feel nausea and chest pain, Anderson says. In one case study, a woman was admitted to the emergency room for rhabdomyolysis after drinking less than five cups of coffee.

Source: Overdosing on Caffeine: A Deadly Trend

All things in moderation, and if necessary – accurate measurement.

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